The Hollies

Rather than create our own Hollies page, we thought you might prefer to visit some of the many Hollies sites!

The Hollies Official UK Page - the main Hollies site. Lots of good info, see whats happening with the band now as well as in the 60s.

On-line Hollies Club - this is a Yahoo message board

Not a Hollies site but may be of interest. German pop project ET CETERA teamed up with ALLAN CLARKE

Excellent history of the group

The Hollies formed in Autumn 1962 with a line-up of Graham Nash on Lead vocals, rhythm & acoustic guitar (Gibson Jumbo), banjo (b. Graham William Nash, Monday, February 2, 1942, The Maternity Ward, The Kimberly Hotel, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK), Eric Haydock on bass (12-string bass, then Six-string Fender VI) (b. Tuesday, February, 3, 1942, Burnley, Lancashire, UK), Allan 'Clarkie' Clarke on lead vocals, harmonica (b. Harold Allan Clarke, Sunday, April 5, 1942, Salford, Lancashire, UK), Don Rathbone on drums (b. Donald Rathbone, October 1942, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK) and 17 year-old Vic Steele on lead guitar (Fender Jazz-master) (b. Victor Winston Farrell, Monday, May 5, 1945, Manchester, Lancashire, UK). 

Graham Nash was the son of William (b. 6 Skinner Street, Salford, Lancashire d. 1961) and Mary Nash (b. Mary Gallagher d. 1981). He also had two younger sisters, Elaine (b. 1946) and Sharon (b. 1953). They all lived at 1 Skinner Street in Salford. 

Graham Nash had met Allan Clarke in 1947, when as five-year old boy's they had met at Ordsall Primary School in Salford. Nash was already at the school and half way through the first term, when a new boy named Allan Clarke arrived at the school and the teacher Mr Burke stood Clarke in front of the class and asked who would like to sit next to this boy. Nash was the only child to put his hand up. So Clarke sat next to him and they became friend's. 

As for Allan Clarke he was one of six children, who included one older brother Frank Clarke. 

Their first live performance was when Nash and Clarke sang ''The Lord Is My Shepherd'' in two part-harmony at a school assembly. Then they both joined the school chorus and then The Salford Boy's Club at the corner of St Ignatius Walk and Coronation Street in Ordsall, Salford. This club was established in 1903 and opened on January 30, 1904 by Robert Baden-Powell (1857 - 1941), later founder of the Scout movement. 

In 1953 Nash passed his eleven plus and went to Salford Grammar School in Chaseley Road, Salford. Allan did not pass, as he was not good at exams and so went to Ordsall Secondary Modern School in Trafford Road, Manchester from 1953 to 1958, where he got his O-Level's in 1958. In spit of having to attended different schools, the boys established a strong musical bond in their early teenage years. At 13 in 1955 Nash got his first cheap acoustic guitar from his father. At the same time Clarke got his father to buy him a guitar and so in their front rooms, they both learned the three chords to ''Rock Island Line'' by Lonnie Donegan (b. Anthony James Donegan, Wednesday, April 29, 1931, Bridgeton, Glasgow, Strathclyde, Scotland, UK d. Sunday, November 3, 2002, Market Deeping, Lincolnshire, UK). 

One day in Spring 1955, while Nash and Clarke were rehearsing, thrashing about on their guitars and singing at Clarke's house, his older brother Frank Clarke came in and herd them play a few numbers. He liked the way they sounded and suggested that why did they not go around the corner to The Devonshire Sporting Club in Salford and audition. Frank Clarke was a member of this working-man's association club. So the boys went off the following day to this place and when Frank Clarke put a word in with the owner, a local wrestler called Bill Benny who was a well-known entrepreneur in the area, he asked them to come up. The boys asked for an audition on this particular Saturday night and Benny liked them, and so they turned up the next week to play one night. They played ''Rock Island Line,'' ''Worried Man Blues'' & ''Lucille.'' They went down like a storm, the crowd loved them for their innocence especially as they were both in short trousers and when they came off stage they got ten bob each from Benny. He also told them could they come back and play the following night (or the following Saturday) for a fiver, to which the boys said yes. The boys were used to getting sixpence from their mums.

So, for the next few months, the boys calling themselves The Two Teens played at The Devonshire Sporting Club, plus several other clubs in the North of England as well. They played Sunday afternoons plus weekend and several week nights. They played lots of gigs and their price slowly went up to two pounds. They were playing night clubs up until two or three in the morning, unheard of, for 14 year-old guys.

Nash's mother would occasionally come by, to make sure he was not drinking beer or being molested. But both his mum and dad, were very supportive and always encouraged Nash. 



The Outlook club in Middlesbrough was a very popular club in the early 60’s.

Saturday 13 July 1963. The Hollies and the Rolling Stones were on the same bill, this was the very first gig the Rolling Stones played out of Greater London on their first UK club tour and a couple of months after they had released their first record “Come On”.

This gig was shortly after The Hollies had released their own first record "(Ain't That) Just Like Me".

Courtesy Brian Swales


 

The boys would also go to church dances and since the Catholic dances were the best, the boys had to learn their Hail Mary prayers, so they could get in. They only let Catholic kids into these dances, so being Protestant they were forced to pass themselves off as Catholic. At one of these functions in Fall 1957 at a dance in the basement of St Clements, a Catholic School in Salford, the boys were half way across the dance floor when they herd ''Bye Bye Love'' by The Everly Brothers. It stopped Nash in his tracks and he immediately brought all the record he could find by The Everly Brothers, who consisted of Don and Phil Everly. Nash would listen to their songs on his phonograph (record player), and because of their two-part harmony, Nash would put a third part on top of what ever they were singing. That's how he learned to sing harmony and The Two Teens worked out their own two part harmonies, on such Everly Brothers songs as ''Wake Up Little Susie.'' They even got to see them live in Manchester on Wednesday, February 13, 1957, eleven days after Nash's fifteenth birthday. They went with Nash's young sister Elaine and after the show got her on a bus to go home. The boys wanted to meet the Everly's and went to their hotel, The Midland and waited outside their to get their autographs. They waited until around one in the morning when Don and Phil Everly turned up and even took the time to speak to the boys. They told the brother's they had their own band and that they copied their style. Don Everly asked if they were any good and Clarke said yes and that they played shows around Manchester. Phil Everly told Clarke and Nash to keep doing it. They spoke for forty minutes and this changed the boy's life. 

In Late 1958 Nash had to leave school and get a job when his father was put in prison. He had purchased a camera from a friend where he worked long hours at David Brown Jackson's a large foundry. The camera was stolen and when the police caught wind of the transaction they cornered Nash's father to tell him it was stolen. When he refused to tell them who he had brought the camera from, he was thrown in jail for a year. So Nash had to get a job to help the family and found work at two pounds ten shillings a week at Alexander Keynon's an engineering firm, where Clarke had been working for several months. Before that he had worked in a cloths mill in Salford to make extra money. The boys had to get up early at around six to get to work which was in Ardwick, Manchester 12. After work at 5.30 a van would pick them up and take them to gigs. When they had finish playing they would get home at around three in the morning. Nash also had a Saturday job in a record shop. 

Then, the guys went away one weekend to The Towers Holiday Camp where they entered a musical competition and reached the finals that were being held on the Monday. The boys decided to skip work and stayed to win the competition with a two-part harmony version of Conway Twitty's ''It's Only Make Believe.'' When they returned to work they were in trouble with their boss and Nash was retained while Clarke was fired. So he then got a job as a laborer at a mill. When Nash subsequently lost his job, for playing rock 'n' roll records at the Christmas company party, he took a civil service exam and then got work with the post office. 

By now they were earning twenty or thirty pounds a week, which was good money for a couple of sixteen year-old's. 

On Wednesday, November 19, 1958 The Two Teens played at The Hippodrome Theatre in Hyde Road, Ardwick Green, Manchester 12, with Canadian impresario Carroll Levis as emcee.  Also their was Johnny Peters front man of The Rockets, The Harmonica Rascals, Ronnie Wycherly (b. Ronald William Wycherley, Wednesday, April 17, 1940, Smithdown Hospital, Sefton, Liverpool 17, Lancashire, UK d. Friday, January 28, 1993, St Mary Abbots Hospital, Paddington, West London, UK), later to change his name to Billy Fury, was slumped in a chair back stage as was Freddie Garrity (b. Fredrick Garrity Jnr, Saturday, November 14, 1936, 123 Crescent Road, Crumpsall, Manchester, Lancashire, UK d. Friday, May 19, 2006, Gwynedd Hospital, Bangor, Gwynedd, North Wales) and from Liverpool was Johnny and the Moondogs, who were made of future Beatles, John Lennon on guitar, vocals (b. John Winston Lennon, Wednesday, October 9, 1940, Oxford Street Maternity Hospital, Kensington, Liverpool 7, Lancashire, UK d. Monday, December 8, 1980, The Dakota Building, Manhattan, New York City, N.Y., USA), Paul McCartney on guitar, vocals (b. James Paul McCartney, Thursday, June 18, 1942, Walton Hospital, Walton, Liverpool, Lancashire, UK), George Harrison on guitar, vocals (b. George Harold Harrison, Thursday, February 25, 1943, 12 Arnold Grove, Wavertree, Liverpool 15, Lancashire, UK d. Thursday, November 29, 2001, Los Angeles, California, USA) with guest Johnny 'Hutch' Hutchinson (b. John Hutchinson, Thursday, July 18, 1940, Malta) sitting in on drums. They had all been in The Quarrymen, who played their last gig on Saturday, November 15, 1958, with Ken Brown on guitar, vocals (b. Kenneth Brown, 1940, Enfield, Middlesex, UK d. c. Wednesday, June 9, 2010, at home in Essex, UK).  

It was also at this time that they decided to change their name from The Two Teens to The Levins, named after Nash's first jumbo guitar. This name did not last long and they became The Guytones, named after the guitars Nash and Clarke played. After working for a few months at Kenyon's Nash was able to buy a Guytone and Clarke was able to do an upgrade on his old electric guitar. They also changed their name, because they figured they weren't little teenagers any more. In addition to undergoing a name change, it was inevitable that Nash and Clarke would eventually expand beyond a duo. 

The idea of forming a new group came from drummer Joe Abrams. One afternoon The Guytones were playing at a relatively small bohemian club called The Bodega at 15 Cross Street, off Deansgate, by Albert Square in Manchester 2, a kind of fake weekend beatnik joint. After they had finished their set, a good-looking young man came up to them and introduced himself as Joe Abrams (b. Joseph Abrams, c. 1942, Manchester, Lancashire, UK), whose father owned the biggest news stand in Manchester around the corner from the Bodega Club. Abrams had left school at fifteen to to help his father sell the newspapers and magazines. Abrams also played drums and came into the pub to check out the Guytones act. He said to Clarke they were a great, but they needed a band. Clarke said no, as they were already earning five pounds each a night and don't need anyone else. But Abrams said you need a drummer, bassist and a lead guitarist. He also told them he was a great drummer and that you need a Bocking. At this Clarke got angry and asked what he was talking about a Bocking. Abrams said no, no you need Pete Bocking in your band. Clarke being interested then asked why they needed him. Abrams smiled saying he could play every solo you have ever herd, every Buddy Holly solo, Gene Vincent solo and all the Little Richard stuff. 

So then Clarke said they should go and meet him and they went to his house in Didsbury, Manchester 20 on the outskirts of the city. Bocking (b. Peter J. Bocking, Saturday, October 31, 1942, Withington, Manchester 20, Lancashire, UK d. Thursday, October 31, 2009, Milnrow, Rochdale, Greater Manchester, UK) was unlike any musician Clarke had met, as he rarely spoke above a whisper, was shy and introverted, wore sunglasses, a dark suit, smoked like a chimney and at seventeen was bald. He also carried this rectangular case that he put on the floor. Clarke asked what was in the case and without talking opened it  and showed him this amazing guitar, a electric Fender Stratocaster. He also played really well like Abram said.   

There is also a story that Pete Bocking, came to Nash's home one night in Early 1960 with his Fender Stratocaster. Bocking, who went bald at twelve, lived with his mum and played guitar all day and all night, so could play all the hip solos. He could be Buddy Holly, Bo Diddley and Chuck Berry, in fact he could be everybody rolled into one.  

So before the night was over it was decided that Bocking and Abrams would join forces with Nash and Clarke and they would hence-forth be known as The Fourtones (Ricky and Dane Young and the Fabulous Fourtones). Nash and Clarke became Ricky and Dane Young. They were also joined by bassist John 'Butch' Mepham (b. Sunday, July 27, 1941, Manchester, Lancashire, UK), thus becoming a real band. Now that skiffle had died down all the bands were now getting into rock 'n' roll.  

Bocking, Mepham and Abrahms had all been in Johnny Peters and the Jets. 

Johnny Peters and the Jets formed in 1958 with Peters on lead vocals (b. Barry James), Pete Bocking on lead guitar, John 'Butch' Murphy on bass (Hofner President), Derek Quinn on lead guitar (b. Sunday, May 24, 1942, Manchester, Lancashire, UK) and Joe Abrams on drums. 
In July 1958 Mepham had been brought an acoustic guitar by his mum for his 17th birthday and then joined his first band The Sidekicks Skiffle Group for about five months. When they broke up, he formed his own band The Meteors with Mepham on vocals, acoustic guitar, George Owen on guitar, Tom Mangen on tea-chest bass (b. Thomas Megan) and Brian Lowe on snare drums. This group split in Late 1959 according to Mepham, as the bands parents kept on telling them to be home early. 

While playing in his own group Mepham had met Derek Quinn (later to be lead guitarist in Freddie and the Dreamers) who was also playing in a skiffle group. One evening Mepham had bumped into him on their way home from work and asked him if he was interested in forming a rock 'n' roll group (as there was not any rock bands in Manchester at the time). 

So became of this meeting Mepham, Quinn, Pete Bocking and Joe Abrams formed The Jets in Late 1959, who were fronted by a young man with a wonderful voice, personality and great stage presence called Johnny Peters (Barry James), a sort of cross between Elvis Presley and our very own Cliff Richard (b. Harry Rodger Webb, Monday, October 14, 1940, King's George Hospital, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh State, British India). To start off with, Peters and Quinn were both on lead guitar, but as Quinn was the better player he eventually took over on lead. Mepham became the bass player, using his Hofner President guitar, as he could not get a bass at that time. 

Johnny Peters and the Jets were a very popular band and where ever they played, Peters got all the girls screaming. The band was very successful and played at dance halls and clubs around Manchester, plus they even did a few gigs down in London. The band carried on for a number of years with different front men, the last being Wayne Fontana (b. Glynn Geoffrey Ellis, Sunday, October 28, 1945, Manchester, Lancashire, UK), future leader of Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders. 

Johnny Peters and the Jets split in Late 1959 and Bocking and Abraham joined forces with The Two Teens, duo, Ricky Young (Allan Clarke) and Dane Young (Graham Nash) to front a new group The Fourtones. So The Fourtones  were formed in Early 1960 in Manchester with Ricky Young (Allan Clarke) on lead vocals, Dane Young (Graham Nash) on rhythm guitar, Pete Bocking on lead guitar (Fender Stratocaster) and Joe Abrams on drums. 

So The Two Teens joined forces with the two ex-Johnny Peters and the Jets to become The Fourtones. Ricky Young (Clarke) and Dane Young (Nash) fronted the new group. They were sometimes known as Ricky and Dane Young and the Fabulous Fourtones. 

The band also realised they needed a bassist and they offered the job to John 'Butch' Mepham, who had a Burns Weil solid body bass. In Early 1960 he got a new bass, a Fender Jazz that he had ordered from Barratts in Manchester. With the name Ricky and Dane, they would get a guest spot with a band called The Flintstones, who had Eric Haydock on bass. They also used to have to hire a driver to take them to gigs and he would get more money than they did. They went on like this until they met Allan Cheetham, who became their manager.   

Meanwhile Nash lost his job at the post office for counting the day's receipts in front of his friend Clarke, who was not an employee of the company. So, to keep money coming into the Nash household, Nash got another day job at a tailor shop owned by Michael Cohen, who later became The Hollies first manager. It was while doing his apprenticeship as a tailor that his father was released from prison in Late 1960. William Nash never recovered from his time there, he was never the same man and he lost his honour and spirit. He had also caught pneumonia while inside and sadly died a year later in 1961.  

On one Saturday in Late 1960 The Fourtones made an acetate at a local record store, on the second floor were they had a     panelled room with egg cartons on the walls to absorb and reflect sound.  

The Fourtones also played places like The Two Jays, The Three Coins and The Twisted Wheel. On Saturday, June 10, 1961 they played at The Bolton Palais in Bolton, Lancashire, where they backed famous early 60's pop singer Lance Fortune (b. Christopher Morris, Thursday, January 4, 1940, Birkenhead, Cheshire, UK) as Lance Fortune and the Fourtones. Fortune had been in lead vocalist in The Firecrests, while a student at Birkenhead School in Birkenhead. He also had two hits in 1960 and was later bassist in a group called The Staggerlees.    

On Thursday, May 11, 1962 they played at The Oasis Club, 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square in Manchester 2 and on Friday, May 18, 1962 at The Three Coins, Fountain Street in Manchester, where they were advertised as Ricky and Dane Young and the Fabulous Fourtones
  
The Fourtones split in Late July 1962, having played their last gig on Saturday, July 28, 1962 at The Three Coins. Bocking then formed The Pete Bocking 6 with Bocking on lead guitar (Fender Stratocaster), his old friend Mepham on six-string bass, 18 year-old Keith Shepherd on four-string bass (b. Thursday, December 23, 1943, Burnage, Manchester 19, Lancashire, UK), Ian Starr on drums, Graham Attwood on sax and Clive Neil on sax. 

As for Vic Steele, under his real name of Vic Farrell, he had been in The Emperors Of Rhythm from 1962 and in June or July 1962, he approached Eric Haydock to replace their departing bassist Rod Clare. The plan didn't work out because The Emperors' rhythm guitarist Eric Stewart (b. Eric Michael Stewart, Saturday, January 20, 1945, Droylsden, Lancashire, UK) and drummer Eric Farrell (Steele's brother), turned professional backing a local singer called Johnny Peters, who Stewart had earlier played with in his band The Crestas. 

Eric Haydock had been an outstanding sportsman at school, collecting a large number of trophies in track events. he left school at 15 in 1958 and went to work as an apprentice engineer in a tool making factory and at 17 in 1959 he brought himself a guitar. He played with several local groups before he joined The Deltas. In his early Hollies days he played a prototype 12-string bass built by Jim Burns, then he got a Six-string Fender VI.  

In Autumn 1962 Clarke, Nash and Steele decided to team up with Haydock and drummer Don Rathbone. Soon after they got together it seems Nash abandoned playing rhythm guitar, even though he played one, which either had no strings on it or just as often was unplugged on stage. The live band did not require one. Still he continued to play rhythm guitar on many recordings.   

As for Rathbone, who was from Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, he had in 1960 started out in The Electrons, formed in 1958 with a line-up of group leader Phil Henshaw on guitar (b. Philip Henshaw, 1939, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK), Cliff Bowers on guitar (b. Clifford Bowers, 1937, Alma Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK d. ), Dave Aldcroft on bass (b. David Aldcroft, 1937, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK), Roy Tomkins on drums (b. 1932, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK) and Gordon Roberts on tenor sax (b. 1936, Alderley Edge, Cheshire, UK). The bands manager was Brian Shapley (b. 1937, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK), who played piano and also doubled on bass. I guess Rathbone replaced Tomkins and did not stay long, leaving in 1960. 

Rathbone was then with Eric Haydock in Kirk Daniels and the Deltas. This band was formed in 1960 with Kirk Daniels on lead vocals (b. Harry Morris d. Friday, October 5, 2007, after a long illness), Tommy Turner on lead guitar (b. Thomas Turner), John Murphy on rhythm guitar, Haydock on bass and Rathbone on drums. They were also known as The Kirk Daniels Group. They also went out as The Flintstones wearing caveman gear. Murphy later played lead guitar with Deke Rivers and the Big Sound. Later Kirk Daniels and the Deltas became The Deltas / The Deltas (featuring Ricky and Dane), without Daniels and Murphy. In came Allan Clarke (Ricky) on lead vocals, Graham Nash (Dane) on rhythm guitar and Vic Farrell on lead guitar. This band was later called The Flintstones again.  

Rathbone was also in The Arrows, formed in Late 1961 with Mick Rhodes on lead guitar (b. Michael Rhodes, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK), Joe Henshall on bass (b. Joseph Henshall, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK), Dave Bowker on rhythm guitar (b. David Bowker, 1947, Strawberry Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK) and Rathbone on drums. In September 1962 the band were joined by lead vocalist Cliff Bowers (b. Clifford Bowers) (ex-The Cestrian Skiffrocks) and the band became Cliff Bowers and the Arrows. By this time Rathbone had left I guess in Autumn 1962 and was replaced by Derek Chadwick (b. Derek Bailey, Wilmslow, Cheshire, UK). 

After a few meetings in Autumn 1962 between Vic Steele (Farrell), Clarke, Nash, and Rathbone at the local coffee / dance club The Oasis at 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square in Manchester 2, the new band was formed. The first practices took place in the  evenings and on Sundays, over The Wimpy Bar in Oxford Road, Manchester 1. After three of four weeks they started gigging under the name of Ricky and Dane Young and the Emperors of Rhythm (or The Dominators of Rhythm), at the local dance halls, plus the youth and coffee dance clubs. Ricky Young was Clarke and Dane Young was Nash. They soon got a regular Wednesday spot at The Oasis, and built up a small following. The type of music they were playing at the time was Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry and The Everly Brothers. 

The band became The Hollies in Autumn 1962. Their first gig was a Sunday in Autumn 1962 at The Two J's Club at 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK, soon to change it's name The Oasis Club. The Two J's was on the ground floor of an old building, one of the first coffee bars in Manchester to feature live music. 

Clarke had told the owner of this club, Jack Jackson that his band were worth a listen, and he agreed to let them audition. Just before they went on the clubs emcee Graham Clegg grabbed the band and said he was about to introduce them and what's the name of the band. They did not have a name at this time and they went in a huddle to come up with one. Don Rathbone came up with The Deadbeats, taking a cue from the family business, his father owned a mortuary. Clarke, thankfully did not agree and said they were more fun than that. So someone else came up with the name The Hollies after one of Clarke's their favourite singers and in an instant they all agreed and they went over and told Clegg, who introduced the group. He told the audience to give this local band a round of applause, The Hollies.      

In September 1962 The Hollies played at The Two J's, that had now changed it's name to The Oasis Club, the gig being advertised on a Beatles poster, The Hollies being advertised as Manchester's newest rockers, who were also playing at the club on Saturday, September 29, 1962, the day before The Hollies played on Sunday, September 30, 1962.  

The Hollies also played a further three gigs at The Oasis Club in December 1962. At this time they may have also gone under the name of Ricky and Dane Young and the Hollies according to Steele, but can't find any gigs under this name. 

The Hollies first gig at the famous Cavern Club at 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool, Lancashire was on Sunday, February 3, 1963. It was at this gig that they were seen by Parlophone assistant producer Ron Richards (b. Ronald Richard Pratley, Tuesday, January 22, 1929, London, UK d. Thursday, April 30, 2009, Watford, Hertfordshire, UK), who had been involved in producing the first Beatles session. Richards offered them an audition with Parlophone. 

On Friday, February 22, 1963 The Hollies played for the first time at the famous Twisted Wheel Club at 30 Brazennose Street, Manchester 2. This club had not been opened for long. Their opening night was on Friday, January 27, 1963 when part Manchester / part Glasgow, Scotland band The Karl Denver Trio played, along with Dean West and The Hellions. 

The Hollies turned professional in March 1963. 

Also in March 1963 they played at The Fire Station Dance Hall in Rochdale, Lancashire, supported by Paul Stevens and the Javelins and Deke Boner and the Kentuckies, then again at The Twisted Wheel Club and twice at The Cavern Club. 

On Thursday, April 4, 1963 The Hollies did their EMI audition at Abbey Road Studio 2 at 3 Abbey Road, St Johns Wood, North West London. They recorded three songs, two became their first single ''(Ain't That) Just Like Me'' / ''Hay What's Wrong With Me'' and a third song ''Whole World Over'' the B-side of their second single.  

Steele left the band in Early May 1963 when The Hollies became professional, just after his 18th birthday, which was on Sunday, May 5, 1963, the night The Hollies played The Twisted Wheel Club again. Steele didn't want to take the risk of an uncertain existence as an artist and wanted to finish his education in Engineering. He was replaced by 17 year-old Tony Hicks on lead & acoustic guitar, banjo, lead vocals (b. Anthony Christopher Hicks, Sunday, December 16, 1945, Bankhouse Road, Nelson, Lancashire, UK). Hicks was living at Bankhouse Road in Nelson.  

Hicks at the time was an apprentice electrician, having joined a firm of electrical engineers on leaving school. During his off-duty hours at weekends he played lead guitar with Nelson, Lancashire group The Dolphins, formed for dance-hall work. He was asked to replace Vic Steele in The Hollies, but Hicks was not interested as he was happy being semi-pro. Still, they talked him into coming into Manchester on a Friday night and went to see them play live at The Twisted Wheel Club, but he stayed outside the club and just listened to them through the air vent. He liked what he herd and he then went inside and watched them on stage, and he started chatting to Eric Haydock, a one-way conversation, as Haydock was not particularity chatty! Then Graham Nash wondered up and explained to Hick's about an up and coming audition at Abbey Road Studios in London. He took a few days off work and rehearsed with the band and went down to Abbey Road and they were excepted. Hicks said it was so exciting and he joined The Hollies full time. Allan Clarke also said that Hicks first asked his father if he could join, and he said yes as long as he was earning 18 pounds a week. That was fine, but the rest of the band were only earning 9 pounds. 

According to drummer Bobby Elliott, Hicks was probably the best guitarist in the North and that Hick's would only join The Hollies if his old band mate from The Dolphins could join. Elliott also said that The Hollies drummer Don Rathbone was the only driver in the band and he drove the van to all the gigs. Rathbone's father owned a mortuary and that allowed them to use the mortuary van. Then Hicks phoned Elliott to tell him there was a job going with Shane Fenton and the Fentones. So he went down to London for the auditions and got the job. Elliott only later found out that 17 year-old Keith Moon (b. Keith John Moon, Friday, August 23, 1946, Central Middlesex County Hospital, Willesden, North West London, UK d. Thursday, September 7, 1978, Flat 12, 9 Curzon Place, Mayfair, West London, UK) and future Who drummer, was also in the same queue.    

So according to Hicks he played at the audition at Abbey Road Studios in April 1963, which meant he joined in February 1963. According to Steele himself he left The Hollies in May 1963 so he must have played at the audition and not Hicks. So Hicks joined in May 1963 and not in February 1963. 

Tony Hicks had got his first guitar at 11 in 1956 and at 12 in Late 1957, he had appeared on TV in a Carroll Levis Show, with The Les Skifflettes. His parents sent him to a music teacher to give him a thorough grounding on which to improve his talent as as a guitarist. 

The Les Skifflettes started out in Winter 1957 with three friend's Russ Lee, Paul Shanahan and Keith Shackleton, all on guitar. This band had several line-ups in the early days, including Lee, Shanahan, Shackleton, David Shackleton on washboard, Frank Lord on tea chest bass, Gerry Cuncliffe on guitar, vocals, 13 year-old Alan Holt on lead vocals (b. 1944, Nelson, Lancashire d. May 2004, after several strokes), 14 year-old Alan Buck on guitar, vocals (b. Wednesday, April 7, 1943, Halifax Road, Briefield, Lancashire, UK d. Tuesday, March 15, 1994, at home in Ealing, West London, from a heart attack), 14 year-old Pat Belshaw on lead vocals (b. Patrick Belshaw, 1943) (later to become Ricky Shaw) and lead vocalist Pat Askew (b. Patricia Askew). She did not work out as she was classically trained and sang everything in soprano.  

The group performed at dance night at St Bede's, St Paul's and St Phillips in Nelson and St Lukes in Briefield both in Lancashire. 

Quiet early on The Les Skifflettes lost Alan Holt and Alan Buck. So into the band in Late 1957 came lead guitarist Hicks. This was the last line-up of Les Skifflettes, now a seven-piece group, who included Pat Belshaw on lead vocals and 12 year-old Hicks on lead guitar. This band in Late 1959 became Ricky Shaw and the Dolphins with 16 year-old Ricky Shaw (Pat Belshaw) on lead vocals, 14 year-old Hicks on lead guitar, 17 year-old Bernie Calvert on bass (b. Bernard Bamford Calvert, Wednesday, September 16, 1942, Briefield, Lancashire, UK) and the returning 16 year-old Alan Buck now on drums. This line-up lasted until 1960 when they split and reformed in 1961 without Buck, who went onto play in Joe Brown and the Bruvvers, Johnny Kidd and the Pirates and The Lionel Morton Four from 1962, that became The Four Pennies (Nov 1963 - 1966). Buck was replaced by drummer Bobby Elliott (b. Robert Hartley Elliott, Monday, December 8, 1941, 13 Chilton Avenue, Burnley, Lancashire, UK). Ricky Shaw and the Dolphins also added rhythm guitarist John Shaw (b. John Robert Shaw). In 1962 the band became The Dolphins without John Shaw and this band split later in 1962. 

On Wednesday, May 15, 1963 The Hollies went back to Abbey Road Studios to record five songs, ''Fortune Teller,'' ''Now's The Time'' (the B-side of their third single), ''Little Love,'' (appeared on their first album''Stay With The Hollies''), ''Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah' and 'Searchin.' All were produced by Ron Richards. 

The Hollies played again at the famous Twisted Wheel Club in Manchester in May 1963, once in June 1963 and twice in July 1963. 

Friday, May 17, 1963 The Hollies released their first single ''(Ain't That) Just Like Me'' which on Thursday, May 30, 1963 became their first hit, when it entered the UK charts reaching 25. 

The Hollies also played the famous Liverpool Cavern Club again, twice in June 1963, twice in July 1963 and then in October 1963. 

In July 1963 the band went into Abbey Road Studios three times on Wednesday, July 3 to record ''Searchin'' & ''Talkin' About You,'' Monday July 15 to record ''Searchin'' & ''I Understand'' and Tuesday, July 23, 1963 to record ''Searchin'' (the A-side of their second single), with Tommy Sanderson on piano (b. Thomas Sanderson), who was one of the bands managers along with Michael Cohen. Searchin' was recorded in 13 takes. 

In August 1963 Rathbone left The Hollies and was replaced by drummer Bobby Elliott, who played Ludwig drums and from 1965 played Premier drums. Actually Rathbone didn't leave the group as such, he was asked to leave because his drumming wasn't really up to the standard. Have also read that Ron Richards was not very pleased with his drumming, and so it was decided that the group should have a new drummer. So Tony Hicks suggested that his friend Bobby Elliott should join. After Rathbone was sacked he worked for The Hollies as their driver and tour manager. 

On Thursday, August 29, 1963 ''Searchin'' The Hollies second single entered the UK charts, making it their second hit reaching 12. 

As for new drummer Bobby Elliott, he had been educated at Holm-in-Clivinger Primary School in Burnley Road, Cliviger, Burnley and when the family moved to a place called Roughlee Village near Burnley, he attended Nelson Grammar School in Nelson, Lancashire. Elliott made friends with Tony Hicks who was four years younger than him and played with him in semi-pro outfit Ricky Shaw and the Dolphins, later called The Dolphins, during Elliott's four-year stint as an apprentice mechanical engineer. 

Elliott had been in a number of bands, starting out in Gerry Storme and the Falcons formed in 1959. This band became Eddie G. Marten and The Falcons in 1960. Elliott then joined Jazz band The Bob Price Quintet in 1960, which he stayed with until 1962. While playing with Bob Price, Elliott also played in Ricky Shaw and the Dolphins, he replaced their drummer Alan Buck. In 1962 Ricky Shaw and the Dolphins became The Dolphins without their rhythm guitarist John Shaw. This band split later in 1962. In Early 1963 Elliott joined Shane Fenton and the Fentones replacing their drummer George Rodda. Elliott did not stay long and he left in April 1963 and was replaced by drummer Don Burrell (b. Donald Burrell). The Fentones carried on until September 1965, while Elliott joined The Hollies in August 1963. 

On Friday, September 13, 1963 while driving down in the van from Scotland, Nash checked to see if the door was locked. It was not and he fell out with the van going at 40 m.p.h. Still, the band continued to London to deputize on ''Go Man Go'' for American rocker Gene Vincent.

On Friday, October 11, 1963 The Hollies were back at Abbey Road Studios to record ''Stay'' (the A-side of their third single) and also the song ''Poison Ivy.'' ''Stay'' was recorded in 8 takes, which meant the band were getting better in the studio. In the Early Fall of 1963 Elliott and Hicks had discovered an old copy of Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs ''Stay'' in a junk shop in Scotland. This gave the band the source of their third single. 

On Thursday, November 21, 1963 The Hollies ''Stay'' entered the UK chats, their third hit and first top ten reaching 8. 

On Tuesday, October 29, 1963 The Hollies were back at the famous Abbey Road Studios to record ''Memphis,'' Talkin' 'Bout You,'' ''It's Only Make Believe,'' ''Lucille,'' ''Baby Don't Cry,'' ''Do You Love Me'' & ''What Kind Of Boy'' (for their first album ''Stay With The Hollies''). It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Wednesday, December 11, 1963 The Hollies were again back at The Abbey Road Studios to record the songs ''Mr Moonlight,'' ''You Better Move On,'' ''Whatcha Gonna Do 'Bout It'' & ''What Kind Of Girl Are You'' (for their first album ''Stay With The Hollies''). It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Wednesday, January 1, 1964 The Hollies played on the first ever BBC TV's Top Of The Pops, with Dusty Springfield, The Rolling Stones, The Swinging Blue Jeans, The Dave Clark Five. 

In January 1964 The Hollies released their first album ''Stay With The Hollies'' on Parlophone PMC 1220, which entered the UK album charts on Saturday, February 15, 1964 reaching 2. 

On Monday, January 27, 1964 the band went back to Abbey Road Studios to record their fourth single, ''Just One Look'' / ''Keep Off That Friend Of Mine'' and ''Candy Man'' (harmonica overdub), that appeared on their first album. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Thursday, February 27, 1964 The Hollies ''Just One Look'' entered the UK charts, their fourth hit reaching 2. 

On Saturday, February 29, 1964 The Hollies appeared on ITV's ''Thank Your Lucky Stars.'' 

On Monday, March 2, 1964 The Hollies were again at Abbey Road Studios to record ''When I'm Not There'' & ''What Kind Of Love'' for their first EP ''The Hollies.'' 

On Thursday, March 24, 1964 Clarke married Jennifer 'Jen' Bowstead, with whom he had three children, Tim (b. July 1966), Toby (b. September 1969) and Piper Clarke (b. 1972).

On Monday, April 13, 1964 the band went into Abbey Road Studios again to record their fifth single ''Here I Go Again'' / ''Baby That's All,'' plus ''The Time For Love'' & ''Don't You Know'' for their second album ''In The Hollies Style.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Sunday, April 26, 1964 The Hollies appeared on ''The New Musical Express Poll Winners Concert'' at The Empire Pool in Wembley, Middlesex, with The Beatles, The Dave Clark Five, Gerry and the Pacemakers plus many others. 

On Monday, April 27, 1964 the band was again back at Abbey Road Studios to record ''You'll Be Mine,'' It's In Her Kiss,'' ''Come On Home,'' ''Too Much Monkey Business'' and ''I Thought Of You Last Night'' (for their second album ''In The Hollies Style''). It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Saturday, May 16, 1964 The Hollies ''Just One Look'' their first US hit, entered the US charts at 98. 

On Thursday, May 21, 1964 The Hollies ''Here I Go Again'' entered the UK charts, their fifth hit, reaching 4 in June 1964. 

On Tuesday, June 30, 1964 the band was back at Abbey Road Studios to record the B-side to their sixth single ''Come On Back,'' plus ''Set Me Free'' and ''Don't Feel To Bad'' for their second album ''In The Hollies Style.'' 

On Monday, July 13, 1964 the band recorded the song ''Party Line'' at Abbey Road Studios. 

On Sunday, August 16, 1964 The Hollies were in Abbey Road Studios to record ''What Kind Of Boy'' (for their second album ''In The Hollies Style'') plus the song ''We're Through.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Tuesday, August 25, 1964 The Hollies recorded again at Abbey Road Studios, recording the song ''It's Raining Teardrops,'' ''We're Through'' the A-side of their sixth single, plus ''To You My Love'' & ''Nitty Gritty'' (which appeared on their second album ''In The Hollies Style''). It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Thursday, September 17, 1964 The Hollies ''We're Through'' entered the UK charts, their sixth hit reaching 7 in October 1964. This was the first hit written by Clarke, Hicks and Nash using the name L. Ransford. 

On Wednesday, October 24, 1964 Clarke has his tonsils removed at Manchester Hospital in Manchester and so all tour dates were cancelled until Sunday, November 15, 1964. 

On Tuesday, November 10, 1964 at Abbey Road Studios The Hollies recorded ''Put Yourself In My Place'' (for their third album ''The Hollies,'' plus the songs ''She Said Yeah'' & ''Cry Now''). It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Tuesday, December 15, 1964 the band was at Abbey Road Studios to record ''Yes I Will'' (for their album ''Hollies Greatest'') plus ''When I Come Home To You'' (for their third album ''The Hollies'') & ''Nobody'' the B-Side of their seventh single and ''You Know He Did'' the B-Side of their eighth single. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Saturday, December 26, 1964 at The Odeon Cinema, in Oxford Street, Manchester, The Hollies opened as guests on the Brian Epstein presentation ''Gerry's Christmas Cracker,'' headlined by Gerry and the Pacemakers, with Cliff Bennett and the Rebel Rousers and singer Tommy Quickly (b. Thomas Quigley, Wednesday, July 7, 1943, Norris Green, Liverpool 11, Lancashire, UK).

On Sunday, January 3, 1965 The Hollies were back at Abbey Road Studios to record the A-side of their seventh single ''Yes I Will.'' 

On Thursday, January 28, 1965 The Hollies ''Yes I Will'' entered the UK charts, their seventh hit reaching 9. 

On Sunday, March 1, 1965 the band went back to Abbey Road Studios to record ''Mickey's Monkey,'' ''That's My Desire'' & ''The Last Day'' (for their third album ''The Hollies''), plus ''You Must Believe Me'' & ''Honey And Wine.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Monday, April 7, 1965 the band recorded ''Honey and Wine'' for their fifth EP ''I'm Alive'' at Abbey Road Studios. 

Between Friday, April 16 and Friday, April 23, 1965 The Hollies went on their First US Tour, playing at The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, a week long engagement, staring Little Richard plus others and hosed by comic Soapy Sales. They also made their fist appearance on American TV, on NBC's ''Hullabloo.''    

On Tuesday, April 27, 1965 The Hollies recorded three tracks at The Bell Studios in West 54th Street, Manhattan, New York City, N.Y., USA, ''Listen Here To Me,'' ''So Lonely'' and ''Bring Back Your Love To Me.'' 

On Wednesday, May 5, 1965 the band was back at Abbey Road Studios to record ''I'm Alive'' the A-side of their eighth single. 

On Thursday, May 27, 1965 The Hollies ''I'm Alive'' entered the UK charts, their eighth hit. This was their first number one. 

In June 1965 Clarke, Nash and Hicks formed the Gralto Music Publishing Company. 

On Wednesday, June 30, 1965 The Hollies were back at Abbey Road Studios to recorded ''Look Through Any Windows,'' the A-side of their ninth single and further tracks for their third album ''The Hollies,'' ''Lawdy Miss Clawdy,'' ''You Must Believe Me'' & ''Little Bitty Pretty One.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Tuesday, July 13, 1965 The Hollies recorded further tracks ''Down The Line,'' ''Fortune Teller,'' ''To Many People'' & ''I've Been Wrong,'' for their third album ''The Hollies' at Abbey Road Studios, plus ''So Lonely'' the B-side of their ninth single. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Thursday, September 2, 1965 ''Look Through Any Window'' entered the UK charts, their ninth hit reaching 4. 

In September 1965 The Hollies released their third album ''The Hollies'' on Parlophone PMC 1261, which entered the UK album charts on Saturday, October 2, 1965 reaching 8. 

On Tuesday, September 14, 1965 The Hollies recorded ''Stewball'' for their fourth album ''Would You Believe'' at Abbey Road Studios & one other track '' She Gives Me Everything I Want.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

Between Saturday September 18 - Tuesday, September 28?, 1965 The Hollies went on a Ten Day US Tour, with The Yardbirds. The first date of tour was on Saturday, September 18, 1965 at  McCormack's Place, Chicago, Cook and DePage County, Illinois, USA and the last date of tour was on Tuesday?, September 28?, 1965: at an unknown venue in the USA. Not sure if The Yardbirds were on this tour as they had just been on their first US Tour? from Wednesday, September 1, 1965 to Saturday, September 18, 1965. 

On Friday, December 24, 1965 The Hollies ''If I Needed Someone'' entered the UK charts, their tenth hit reaching 20. 

On Saturday, January 8, 1966 The Hollies ''Look Through Any Window'' entered the US charts, their first hit there, which on Saturday, January 22, 1966 reached 32. 

On Tuesday, January 13, 1966 The Hollies went into Abbey Road to record ''I Can't Let Go'' / ''Running Through The Night.'' 

On Thursday, February 24, 1966 The Hollies ''I Can't Let Go'' entered the UK charts their eleventh hit reaching 2. 

On Friday, March 25, 1966 The Hollies recorded two further tracks ''Sweet Little Sixteen'' & ''I Am A Rock'' for their fourth album ''Would You Believe'' at Abbey Road, plus another track ''Have You Ever Loved Somebody.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

It was also around this time that Haydock left the band. It seem he was fired in April 1966 as when the band returned from a European Tour, they found he was unwilling or unable to perform at various scheduled gigs. Haydock's last gig with The Hollies was on Saturday, May 7, 1966 at Pismo Beach, California, USA, the last date of their first US Tour. 

On Tuesday, May 10, 1966 The Hollies went into Abbey Road Studios to record ''After The Fox,'' with famous comedian/actor Peter Sellers CBE (b. Richard Henry Sellers, Tuesday, September 8, 1925, Castle Road, Southsea, Hampshire, UK d. Thursday, July 24, 1980, The Middlesex Hospital, Fitzrovia, West London, UK). The problem was Haydock refused to go into the studio and so Jack Bruce (b. John Symon Asher Bruce, May 14, 1943, 56 Beaufort Gardens, Bishopsbriggs, Dunbartonshire, UK) played bass instead. The famous American singer-songwriter Burt Bacharach (b. Burt Freeman Bacharach, Saturday, May 12, 1928, Kansas City, Missouri, USA) played piano.  

On Saturday, May 7, 1966 The Hollies US single ''I Can't Let Go'' reached 42. The single had been released in February 1966. 

On Thursday May 12 or Friday, May 13, 1966 The Hollies manager Mike Cohen called Bernie Calvert at his job in the factory to see if he would be available to play bass on The Hollies' upcoming tour to Scandinavia, starting in just over a week. Calvert said yes. 

On Friday, May 13, 1966 the band appeared on BBC Radio?, with German Klaus Voorman on bass? 

On Saturday May 14, 1966 some of The Hollies, Graham Nash, Tony Hicks, Bobby Elliott and Bernie Calvert, without Allan Clarke participated in a recording session for the Everly Brothers' album ''Two Yanks In England.'' 

On Sunday, May 15, 1966 The Hollies appeared on ITV's ''Sunday Night At The London Palladium.'' When Haydock failed to show up the band used bassist Klaus Voorman (b. Tuesday, April 29, 1938, North Berlin, Germany). Voorman later rehearsed with the group, but turned down the offer to join the band, he instead joined Manfred Mann (July 1966 - June 1969). 

On Tuesday, May 17, 1966 the band went into Abbey Road Studios to record the B-side of their thirteenth single ''Don't Run And Hide,'' with John Paul Jones on bass (b. John Baldwin, Thursday, January 3, 1946, Sidcup, Kent, UK) (ex-The Deltas from 1960, The Jett Blacks, Jet Harris and Tony Meehan).  

On Wednesday, May 18, 1966 the band went into Abbey Road to record the A-side of their thirteenth single ''Bus Stop'' (Graham Gouldman) with Calvert on bass. It was produced by Ron Richards. It was also on this day that The Hollies announced that Bernie Calvert was now a member of the band. 

On Thursday, May 26 and Friday, May 27, 1966 in Bremen, Germany, the band taped performances for the TV show ''Beat Club.'' Nash also did an interview for the show. It was aired on Saturday, May 28, 1966.  

From Saturday, May 21 to Monday, June 13, 1966 The Hollies went on their tour of Denmark and Sweden, with Calvert on bass, vocals. 

In June 1966 The Hollies released their fourth album ''Would You Believe'' on Parlophone PMC 7008, which entered the UK album charts on Saturday, July 16, 1966. 
When The Hollies returned to England from their Scandinavian tour on Tuesday, June 14, 1966 Calvert returned to his factory job and did not join the band permanently until Late July 1966. Also in the frame to be The Hollies next bassist was ex-Kinks bass player Pete Quaife (b. Peter Alan Greenlaw Quaife, Friday, December 31, 1943, The Cold Fall Estate, Steads Road, Muswell Hill, North West London, UK d. Wednesday, June 23, 2010, Copenhagen, Denmark, of kidney failure). 

On Wednesday, June 15, 1966 the band appeared on Granada ITV's ''Scene At 6.30.'' 

 On Thursday, June 16, 1966 the band appeared on BBC 1's ''Top Of The Pops,'' with Calvert on bass. 

On Thursday, June 17, 1966 the band appeared on Rediffusion ITV's ''Ready Steady Go.''  

On Monday, June 20, 1966 The Hollies went into Abbey Road Studios to record ''Have You Ever Loved Somebody'' & ''Stop The Dance'' (an early version of ''Stop! Stop! Stop!''). Kenny Sammon (b. Kenneth Sammon) supplemented the group on organ. 

On Tuesday, June 21, 1966 the band appeared on Rediffusion ITV's ''Five O'Clock Show.'' 

On Wednesday, June 22, 1966 the band appeared on BBC Radio's ''Easy Beat.'' 

On Thursday, June 23, 1966 The Hollies single ''Bus Stop'' entered the UK charts, their twelfth hit reaching 5. 

On Wednesday, June 29, 1966 the band appeared on BBC's TV's ''Hey Presto - It's Rolf.'' 

On Friday, July 1, 1966 the band appeared on Rediffusion ITV's ''Ready Steady Go'' and BBC's TV's ''Hey Presto - It's Rolf.'' 

When Haydock finally left the band in Late July 1966 he formed his own short-lived group Haydock's Rockhouse with Haydock on bass, Ken Knight on drums (b. Kenneth Knight), Barry Worthington on tenor sax, flute, Pete Ainsworth on lead vocals (b. Peter Ainsworth, Stockport, Cheshire, UK), Ian Brooks on bass, occasional trumpet and Dereck Taylor on lead guitar, bass (ex-The Toggery Five). 

This was an already existing band called The Soul Executives formed in 1962 by Ian Brooks on bass (Burns), occasional trumpet, Ken Knight on drums and Worthington on tenor sax, flute with Pete Ainsworth on lead vocals (b. Peter Ainsworth), Graham Attwood on baritone sax, Bill Conway on vibes, organ, alto sax (b. William Conway) and Dereck Taylor on lead guitar, bass. 

In Late July 1966 Attwood left after a splat with Ainsworth and Brooks moved over to full time trumpet. The band advertised for a bass player and Haydock, who had just left The Hollies walked into their rehearsal room and asked to join the band. They also changed their name as there was another band in Blackpool called The Executives, who included future Jethro Tull flutist and lead vocalist Ian Anderson MBE (b. Ian Scott Anderson, Sunday, August 10, 1947, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, UK). Not long after that Haydock did not want Conway in the band and so he left. Not long after that Brooks had a run in with Ainsworth and left to join Gin House. So Taylor became the bassist and the band was joined by Roger Wallborn on lead guitar, vocals? A later members of the band was organist Tony Danforth (b. Anthony Danforth) and drummer Hector Smith. 

On Monday, August 1, 1966 The Hollies US single ''Look Through Any Window'' entered the US charts. This was their breakthrough US hit, which on Friday, September 2, 1966 reached 5. 

On Tuesday, August 16, 1966 The Hollies recorded ''Peculiar Situation,'' ''Suspicious Look In Your Eye'' & ''Tell Me To My Face'' for their fifth album ''For Certain Because'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Wednesday, August 17, 1966 The Hollies recorded the A-side of their fourteenth single ''Stop! Stop! Stop!'' 

On Saturday, August 20, 1966 The Hollies single ''Bus Stop,'' entered the US charts, reaching 5. 

On Monday, August 22, 1966 The Hollies recorded ''Tell Me To My Face'' & ''Pay You Back With Interest'' for their fifth album ''For Certain Because'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Tuesday, August 23 & Wednesday, August 24, 1966 The Hollies recorded ''Clown,'' ''It's You'' & ''Crusaders'' at Abbey Road Studios for their fifth album ''For Certain Because.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Wednesday, August 31, 1966 The Hollies recorded ''What Wrong With The Way I Live'' at Abbey Road Studios for their fifth album ''For Certain Because,'' they also recorded ''Stop! Stop! Stop! as a backing track for a TV performance. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On September 2, 1966 Bernie Calvert made his TV d?but with The Hollies on ''The Five O'Clock Show.'' 

 On Thursday, October 13, 1966 The Hollies fourteenth single ''Stop, Stop, Stop'' entered the UK charts reaching 2.

On Monday, October 17, 1966 The Hollies recorded ''What Went Wrong'' & ''High Classed'' for their fifth album ''For Certain Because'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Saturday, November 12, 1966 The Hollies single ''Stop, Stop, Stop'' entered the US charts reaching 7.

In December 1966 The Hollies released their fifth UK album ''For Certain Because'' on Parlophone PCS 17011, which entered the UK album charts on Saturday, December 17, 1966.

On Wednesday, January 11, 1967 The Hollies recorded the B-Side of their fifteenth ''All The World Is Love,'' plus ''When Your Light's Turned On'' & ''Have You Ever Loved Somebody'' their sixth album ''Evolution'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Friday, January 13, 1967 The Hollies recorded the A & B-Side of their Italian single ''Non Prego Per Me'' & Devi Aver Fiducia In Me'' plus ''Lullaby To Tim'' their sixth album ''Evolution,'' plus the A-Side of their fifteenth ''On A Carousel'' all at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Thursday, February 16, 1967 The Hollies single ''On A Carousel'' entered the UK charts reaching 4.

On Wednesday, February 22, 1967 The Hollies recorded ''The Games We Play'' for their sixth album ''Evolution,'' plus the A & B-Side of their Italian single ''We're Alive'' & Kill Me Quick'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Friday, March 3, 1967 The Hollies recorded ''Rain On The Window,'' ''Then The Heartaches Begin,'' ''Ye Old Coffee Shoppe,'' ''You Need Love,'' ''Leave Me'' & ''Stop Right There'' for their sixth album ''Evolution'' at Abbey Road Studios, plus the song ''Step Inside.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Wednesday, March 8, 1967 The Hollies recorded ''The Games We Play,'' ''Water On The Brain'' & ''Heading For A Fall'' for their sixth album ''Evolution'' at Abbey Road Studios, plus the song ''Schoolgirl.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Friday, March 17, 1967 The Hollies recorded ''Rain On The Window,'' ''Then The Heartaches Begin,'' ''Ye Old Coffee Shoppe,'' ''You Need Love,'' ''Stop Right There,'' ''Water On The Brain'' & ''Heading For A Fall'' for their sixth album ''Evolution'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

Because Bobby Elliott was ill for these recordings, they replaced him on February, 22, 1967 with drummer Mitch Mitchell (b. John Ronald Mitchell, Wednesday, July 9, 1946, Ealing, West London d. Wednesday, November 12, 2008, The Benson Hotel, Portland, Oregon, USA). On March 3, 1967 he was replaced by drummers Clem Cattini (b. Clemente Anselmo Arturo Cattini, Saturday, August 28, 1937, Stoke Newington, North London, UK) (ex-The Beat Boys, Aug - Dec 1959, Johnny Kidd and the Pirates from Jan 1960, Colin Hicks and the Cabin Boys, July - Aug 1961, The Torndoes, Sept 1961 - Feb 1965) and Dougie Wright (b. Douglas Wright, 1937, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK) (ex-The Bill Marsden Band, The John Barry Seven from 1958, The Ted Taylor / Bobby Rogers Four from Oct 1962). On March 8, 1967 Wright replaced Elliott again.  

On Monday, April 3, 1967 the band recorded at Abbey Road Studios the song ''Step Inside.'' 

On Saturday, April 15, 1967 The Hollies single ''On A Carousel'' entered the US charts reaching 11. 

On Saturday, May 1, 1967 the group were at Abbey Road Studios again to record ''Carrie Anne'' and on Sunday, May 2, 1967 to record ''Signs That I Will Never Change'' the A-Side and B-Side of their seventeenth single. 

On Thursday, June 1, 1967 The Hollies single ''Carrie Anne'' entered the UK charts reaching 3. 

On Tuesday, June 13, 1967 Hicks entered St George's Hospital in London, for a minor operation to cure a sinus condition.  

In June 1967 The Hollies released their seventh album ''Evolution'' on Parlophone PCS 7022, which entered the UK album charts on Saturday, June 17, 1967. 

On Saturday, June 24, 1967 The Hollies single ''Pay You Back With Interest'' entered the US charts reaching 28. 

On Saturday, July 8, 1967 The Hollies single ''Carrie Anne'' entered the US charts reaching 9. 

On Tuesday, August 1, 1967 the group were at Abbey Road Studios to recorded ''Charlie and Fred'' & ''Step Inside'' their seventh album ''Butterfly.'' 

On Thursday, August 3 & Friday, August 4, 1967 The Hollies went into Abbey Road Studios to recorded ''King Midas In Reverse,'' the was the A-side of their seventeenth single. On Tuesday, September 5, 1967 they went into Abbey Road Studios to recorded the B-side of this single ''Everything Is Sunshine.'' 

On Tuesday, September 5, 1967 the band recorded ''Try It,'' for their seventh album ''Butterfly'' at Abbey Road Studios, plus ''Everything Is Sunshine'' the B-Side of their seventeenth single. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Tuesday, September 12, 1967 The Hollies recorded ''Would You Believe'' & ''Pegasus The Flying Horse'' for their seventh album  ''Butterfly'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Tuesday, September 26, 1967 the band recorded ''Dear Eloise'' & ''Elevated Observations'' for their seventh album ''Butterfly'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards.  

On Wednesday, September 27, 1967 The Hollies ''King Midas In Reverse'' entered the UK charts. 

On Thursday, October 5, 1967 The Hollies recorded ''Would You Believe,'' ''Away Away Away,'' ''Charlie and Fred'' & ''Butterfly'' for their seventh album ''Butterfly'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Friday, October 6, 1967 The Hollies recorded ''Maker'' (sitar overdub) for their seventh album ''Butterfly'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Tuesday, January 9 & Thursday, January 11, 1968 The Hollies went into Abbey Road Studios to recorded ''Open Up Your Eyes,'' the B-side of their eighteenth single. 

On Saturday, February 3, 1968 The Hollies went into The Chappell Studios at 50 New Bond Street, Soho, West London to recorded ''Jennifer Eccles,'' the A-side of their eighteenth single, which had Rod King on steel guitar (born Roderick King).

On Thursday, February 22, 1968 the band went into Abbey Road Studios to recorded ''Jennifer Eccles,'' the A-side of their eighteenth single, which had Rod King on steel guitar (born Roderick King). 

On Wednesday, March 27, 1968 The Hollies single ''Jennifer Eccles'' entered the UK charts and in April reached number 7. This Clarke  and Nash written song with Jennifer being Clarke's wife's forename and Eccles is Nash's wife's maiden name. 

On Tuesday, March 26 & Wednesday, March 27, 1968 the band went into Abbey Road Studios to record three tracks, ''Tomorrow Never Comes,'' ''Relax'' & ''You Were A Pretty Little Girl.'' 

On Tuesday, April 2, 1968 the band went into to Abbey Road Studios to recorded ''Marrakesh Express'' (Backing Track). 

On Tuesday, May 14 & Wednesday, May 15, 1968 The Hollies went into The Chappell Studios again to recorded ''Life Every Time Before'' the A-Side of their German single & ''Do The Best You Can'' the B-Side of their twentieth single.  

On Saturday, May 18, 1968 The Hollies single ''Jennifer Eccles'' entered the US charts reaching 40. 

On Sunday, May 26, 1968 the band went into The Lewisham Odeon, 268 Barking Road, Lewisham, South West London to record The Hollies Stage Show. 

On Monday, June 17, 1968 The Hollies went into Abbey Road Studios to record ''Do The Best You Can,'' the B-side of their nineteenth single. 

On Wednesday, July 3, 1968 the band went into Air Studios at Lyndhurst Hall, Lyndhurst Road, Hampstead, North West London to record ''Like Every Time Before'' the A-Side of their German single. 

In July 1968 it is announced by The Hollies management that Graham Nash and Bernie Calvert will be releasing solo albums. The speculation is rife that Nash will leave as he was not happy about the groups musical direction since their single ''King Midas In Reverse.'' 

On Friday, July 19, 1968 The Hollies released their nineteenth US single ''Do The Best You Can'' and ''Elevated Observation'' on Epic 5-10361. 

In August 1968 The Hollies played a UK Cabaret Season, wearing matching suits, and widening their stage repertoire.    

In August 1968 The Hollies released their ninth album ''Hollies' Greatest Hits'' on Parlophone PCS 7057, which entered the charts on Saturday, August 17, 1968. On Saturday, October 12, 1968 it entered number one in the album charts.

On Wednesday, August 28, 1968 they went into Abbey Road Studios to record ''Listen To Me,'' the A-side of this single, which had on piano Nicky Hopkins (b. Nicholas Christian Hopkins, February 24, 1944, The Park Royal Hospital, Harlesden, North West London, UK d. Tuesday, September 6, 1994, Nashville, Tennessee, USA) (ex-Screaming Lord Sutch and the Savages). He had played on a lot of Who singles, albums. 

On Saturday, September 7, 1968 The Hollies appeared on the BBC's ''Colour Me Pop.'' 

On Saturday, September 14, 1968 The Hollies appeared on German TV's ''Beat Club,'' with Status Quo and The Nice. 

On Saturday, September 14, 1968 The Hollies single ''Do The Best You Can'' stalled at number 93 in the US charts.  

On Saturday, October 2, 1968 The Hollies ''Listen To Me'' entered the UK charts. it reached 11 on Friday October 26, 1968. The song was written by Tony Hazzard (b. Anthony Hazzard, Sunday, October 31, 1943, Liverpool, Lancashire, UK).

On Monday, November 4, Tuesday, November 5 and Wednesday, November 6, 1968 they went into Abbey Road Studios to record ''I Shall Be Released, Mighty Quinn, ''The Times They Are A-Changin,'' ''Quit Your Lowdown Ways,'' ''I Want You,'' ''Just Like A Women,'' ''When The Ships Come In,'' ''My Back Pages,'' ''I'll Be Your Baby Tonight'' & ''All I Really Want To Do'' for their eighth album ''The Hollies Sing Dylan,'' plus the song ''This Wheels On Fire.'' Graham Nash was absent from the recordings and ''I Shall Be Released'' had Alan Parker (b. Alan Frederick Parker, Saturday, August 26, 1944, Matlock, Derbyshire, UK) on lead guitar (later of Blue Mink, Ugly Custard, ex-The Alan Parker Sound). 

In December 1968 Graham Nash left the band to join Crosby, Stills and Nash and was replaced by lead guitarist, lead vocalist Terry Sylvester (b. Terence Sylvester, Tuesday, January 8, 1946, Allerton, Liverpool, Lancashire, UK), who had been to The Morrison School For Boys in Rose Lane, Allerton, Liverpool with future Assassins, Profiles, Masterminds from 1965, Fruit Eating Bears from Feb 1966 & Badfinger lead guitarist Joey Molland (b. Joseph Charles Molland, Saturday, June 21, 1947, Edge Hill, South East Liverpool 7, Lancashire, UK). 

Sylvester's first band was The Escorts formed in October 1962 with two classmates Mike Gregory and John Kinrade, who had all just left The Morrison School For Boys in Allerton, Liverpool. The rest of the band were made up of two mates, John Foster and Ray Walker. The line-up had Walker on lead vocals (ex-The Deltics from 1957, Ray and the Del Renas from 1959), Kinrade on lead guitar (White Fender Stratocaster) (b. John Knowles, Tuesday, June 25, 1946, Southport, Lancashire, UK), Sylvester on rhythm guitar (White Fender Stratocaster), vocals, Gregory on bass (White Fender Precision), vocals (b. Michael Gregory, Thursday, November 7, 1946, Oxford Street Maternity Hospital, Kensington, Liverpool 7, Lancashire, UK) and John 'Johnny Sticks' Foster on drums (Ajax) (ex-The Wackers), the cousin of The Beatles drummer Ringo Starr (b. Richard Starkey Jnr, Sunday, July 7, 1940, 9 Madryn Street, The Dingle, Liverpool 8, Lancashire, UK). 

Gregory had been to Windsor Street Primary School in Toxteth, Liverpool 8 and then gone to Morrison School For Boys in Greenbank Road, Mossley Hill, Liverpool 18, where he met Sylvester and Kinrade. When the band formed in October 1962 the groups drummer was Mickey Hacket, who lived down the street from Sylvester, had a little set of drums and agreed to come and practise with the band. They practised at Saint Alyosuis Chuch in Queen Drive, Liverpool in their Church Hall. Hacket was not up to it and so the band brought in Ringo Starr's cousin John Foster, who had his old Ajax kit. Now all they needed was a singer and thanks to Sylvester who worked in J. Davies with Terry Fisher the lead guitarist in The Del Renas, he recommended their lead singer Ray Walker, who had just left the band. 

The Escorts worked up a stage act inspired by Cliff Richard and the Shadows / Shane Fentone and the Fentones, and got a residency at Alan Williams' Blue Angle Club in Liverpool in 1962, thanks to Ringo Starr. They also got a gig in Holyoake Hall in Smithdown Road, Wavertree, Liverpool 15. 

In April 1963 Walker left the band, quit the music biz and got married. Sylvester took over lead vocals and Gregory sang harmony vocals, with a sound very much like The Everly Brothers. Foster also left and joined the Crosby based Dions, who got going in June 1964, having evolved from Roy Brooks and the Dions. Foster was replaced by Pete Clarke (b. Peter Gaskell, 1946) on Premier drums. He had been playing for 18 months. 

In May 1963 The Escorts won The Lancashire and Cheshire Beat Group Contest at The Philharmonic Concert Hall in Liverpool. On Saturday, August 3, 1963 The Escorts were hand picked to support The Beatles on their last show at the famous Cavern Club at 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2.

Clarke left in October 1964 and was replaced by Gregory's friend Kenny 'Goody' Goodlass (b. Kenneth Goodlass, 1946) (ex-The Tuxedos, The Panthers, The Kirkbys from March 1964). Clarke joined Them Grimbles and re-joined The Escorts in September 1965. Goodlass went to The Fruit Eating Bears formed in February 1966. In January 1966 Clarke left again and became a top session man as well as player with The Liverpool Scene & folk-rock group Trees. He was replaced by drummer Tommy Kelly (b. Thomas Kelly) (ex-The Young Ones, Earl Preston's Realms). 

In February 1966 a few weeks after Kelly joined, Sylvester having just turned 20 and with a wife and child to support, was not slow to respond when he got an offer to join The Swinging Blue Jeans (formed April 1963), which quadrupled the income he was getting with The Escorts. He was replaced by rhythm guitarist, organist, vocalist Frank Townsend (ex-The Easybeats, 1962 - 1965). The Escorts with other changes carried on until July 1967. As for Sylvester he replaced rhythm guitarist, vocalist Ralph Ellis (b. Sunday, March 8, 1942, Liverpool, Lancashire, UK) in The Swinging Blue Jeans, whose line-up at the time was Ray Ennis on lead guitar, vocals (b. Raymond Vincent Ennis, Sunday, May 26, 1940, Huyton, East Liverpool 36, Lancashire, UK), Les Braid on bass, vocals (b. William Leslie Braid, Wednesday, September 15, 1937, West Derby Road, West Derby, Liverpool 12, Lancashire, UK d. Sunday, July 31, 2005, Fazakerley Hospital, Fazakerley, North Liverpool 9, Merseyside, UK), Norman Kuhlke on drums (b. Wednesday, June 17, 1942, Liverpool, Lancashire, UK) and Sylvester on rhythm guitar, vocals. 

In July 1967 The Swinging Blue Jeans were joined by Sylvester's old friend Mike Gregory, who became the bassist, vocalist, while Les Braid became organist, vocalist. This line-up lasted until December 1968 when Sylvester left The Blue Jeans to join The Hollies. 

On Wednesday, January 1, 1969 at Chappell's Studio, at 50 New Bond Street, Soho, West London, The Hollies recorded two songs ''Angel Of The Morning'' & ''Dang Me,'' plus ''The Mighty Quinn'' for their eighth album ''The Hollies Sing Bob Dylan.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. 

In January 1969 at Cardiff University, Cardiff, South Glamorgan, South Wales, Terry Sylvester played his d?but gig with The Hollies. 

On Monday, January 27 and Tuesday, January 28, 1969 at Abbey Road Studios The Hollies recorded their nineteenth single ''Sorry Suzanne'' & ''Not That Way At All.'' This is Sylvester's first studio session with the group. 

The Hollies went back to Abbey Road Studios, on Monday, February 17, Tuesday, February 18, Wednesday February 19 & Thursday, February 20, 1969 (to record the vocal overdubs) and Sunday, March 3 & Monday, March 4, 1969 (to record the orchestral overdubs), for the songs ''I Shall Be Released,'' ''The Mighty Quinn,'' ''The Times They Are A-Changin','' ''Quit Your Lowdown Ways,'' ''I Want You,'' ''Just Like A Women,'' ''When The Ships Come In,'' ''My Back Pages,'' ''I'll Be Your Baby Tonight,'' & ''All I Really Want To Do'' for their eighth album ''The Hollies Sing Bob Dylan.'' This was the first album with new member Terry Sylvester. It was produced by Ron Richards and the strings were arranged and conducted by Lew Warburton. One track, ''Blowin' In The Wind'' had string arrangements and composing by ex-Manfred Mann guitarist, flautist, saxophonist Mike Vickers (born Michael Vickers, Thursday, April 18, 1940, Southampton, Hampshire, UK). 

On Monday, February 24, 1969 Sylvester made his Hollies TV d?but on TV's BBC1 's ''Dee Time,'' presented by DJ Simon Dee (b. Cyril Nicholas Henry-Dodd, Sunday, July 28, 1935, Manchester, Lancashire, UK d. Saturday, August 29, 2009, Winchester, Hampshire, UK, of bone cancer). 

On Saturday, March 5, 1969 The Hollies ''Sorry Suzanne'' entered the UK charts and reached 3 in April 1969. This song was written by Tony Macauley (b. Anthony Gordon Instone, Friday, April 21, 1944, Fulham, South West London, UK) and Geoff Stephens (b. Geoffrey Stephens, Monday, October 1, 1934, Southgate, North London, UK). 

In May 1969 The Hollies released their tenth album ''The Hollies Sing Dylan'' on Parlophone PCS 7078, which entered the UK album charts on Saturday, May 17, 1969.

On Sunday June 23 & Monday, June 24, 1969 The Hollies went back into Abbey Road Studios to record ''Do You Believe In Love'' & ''Please Sign The Letters'' for their ninth album ''The Hollies Sing The Hollies'' which was produced by Ron Richards. They also recorded '' Cos You Like To Love Me'' the B-side to their twenty first single. 

On Wednesday, June 25, 1969 at Abbey Road Studios, the band recorded their twenty first single ''He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother'' & also recorded ''Please Let Me Please'' for their album ''Confessions Of The Mind.'' Sir Elton Hercules John CBS (b. Reginald Kenneth Dwight, Tuesday, March 25, 1947, 55 Pinner Hill Road, Pinner, Middlesex, UK) played piano on these tracks. It was produced by Ron Richards.

On Sunday, June 30, 1969 The Hollies went back into Abbey Road Studios & ''Goodbye Tomorrow'' for their ninth album ''The Hollies Sing The Hollies'' which was produced by Ron Richards. 
On Monday, July 1 and Tuesday, July 2, 1969 the band was back at Abbey Road Studios to record the song ''She Looked My Way'' and ''My Life Is Over With You'' for their ninth album ''The Hollies Sing The Hollies'' which was produced by Ron Richards.

On Thursday, August 7, 1969 The Hollies were back at Abbey Road Studios to record the choir & orchestra overdubs for their twenty first single ''He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother'' and ''Please Let Me Please'' for their album ''Hollies Sing Hollies.'' It was produced by Ron Richards.

On Thursday, September 11 & Friday, September 12, 1969 The Hollies were back at Abbey Road Studios to record ''Soldiers Dilemma'' & ''Marigold; Gloria Swansong'' for their ninth album ''Hollies Sing Hollies.'' It was produced by Ron Richards.

On Monday, September 15, 1969 The Hollies were back at Abbey Road Studios to record ''Too Young To Be Married'' 
for their tenth album ''Confessions Of The Mind,'' which was produced by John Burgess and ''Why Don't You Believe'' for their ninth album ''The Hollies Sing The Hollies'' which was produced by Ron Richards.

On Tuesday, September 16, 1969 The Hollies were back at Abbey Road Studios to record ''You Love Cos You Like It'' & ''Don't Give Up Easily'' for their ninth album ''The Hollies Sing The Hollies,'' which was produced by Ron Richards.

On Wednesday, September, 17, Thursday, September 18 & Friday, September 19, 1969 The Hollies were back at Abbey Road Studios to record ''Why Don't You Believe'' & ''Look At Life'' for their ninth album ''The Hollies Sing The Hollies'' which was produced by Ron Richards, plus two tracks ''The Race Is On'' & ''Louisiana Man.'' 

On Tuesday, September 23 & Wednesday September 24, 1969 The band recorded two songs at ''Dang Me'' & ''Kentucky Women.'' 

On Thursday, September 25, 1969 The Hollies recorded ''Don't Give Up Easy'' at Abbey Road Studios for their ninth album ''Hollies Sing Hollies,'' which was produced by Ron Richards. 

On Saturday, October 4, 1969 The Hollies ''He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother'' entered the UK charts reaching 3. This became their second number one. The was mostly written by Graham Nash. 

On Friday, October 10, 1969 The Hollies recorded ''Reflections Of A Time Long Past'' at Abbey Road Studios for their ninth album ''Hollies Sing Hollies,'' which was produced by Ron Richards. 

In October 1969 The Hollies appear on UK TV's ''The Bobbie Gentry Show,'' singing several atypical country style-songs. 

On Monday, November 3, Tuesday, November 4, Wednesday, November 5 & Thursday, November 6, 1969 The Hollies recorded ''I Want To Shout,'' ''Lady Please,'' ''Man Without A Heart,'' ''Separated'' & Little Girl'' for their tenth album ''Confessions of The Mind,'' plus the song ''Sign Of The Times'' at Abbey Road Studios. It was produced by John Burgess. 

On Monday, November 12, Tuesday, November 13 & Wednesday, November 14, 1969 The Hollies recorded ''Freightened Lady,'' for their tenth album ''Confessions of The Mind,'' plus two songs ''Eleanors Castle,'' ''Sign Of The Times'' & ''He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother'' for a BBC Radio recording. It was produced by John Burgess.  

On Monday, December 8, Tuesday, December 9, Wednesday, December 10, Thursday, December 11, Friday, December 12, 1969 the bad was back at Abbey Road Studios were they recorded ''Confessions Of The Mind'' for their tenth album ''Confessions of The Mind,'' plus ''Mad Professor Blyth'' for their B-side, plus the song ''Sign Of The Times'' & ''Carrie Anne'' for a BBC Radio Broadcast. It was produced by John Burgess.  Some songs on this album ''Confessions of The Mind,'' were written by Tony Macaulay (b. Anthony Gordon Instone, Friday, April 21, 1944, Fulham, South West London, UK) and Guy Fletcher OBE (b. Mervyn Guy Fletcher, 1944, St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK). 

On Monday, February 2, 1970 The Hollies ''He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother'' entered the US charts reaching 7. 

On Monday, March 9, Tuesday, March 10, Wednesday, March 11, Thursday, March 12 & Friday, March 13, 1970 at Abbey Road Studios the band recorded their twenty first single ''I Can't Tell The Bottom From The Top'' plus one song ''Survival Of The Fittest'' for their tenth album ''Confessions of The Mind,'' plus three other songs''Wings,'' ''Bobby's Prologue'' & ''Isn't It Nice.'' It was produced by Ron Richards. ''I Can't Tell The Bottom From The Top'' had Elton John on piano. It was produced by John Burgess.  

On Monday, March 17, Tuesday, March 18, Wednesday, March 19 and Thursday, March 20, 1970 at Abbey Road Studios The Hollies recorded''Perfect Lady Housewife'' and ''Isn't It Nice'' for their tenth album ''Confessions Of The Mind,'' which was produced by John Burgess. They also recorded the song ''Bobby's Prologue.'' On the track ''Perfect Lady Housewife'' Elton John played the Hammond organ. It was produced by John Burgess.  

On Saturday, April 18, 1970 The Hollies ''I Can't Tell The Bottom From The Top'' entered the UK charts reaching 7.

On Monday, May 4, 1970 at Abbey Road Studios The Hollies recorded ''Too Young To Married,'' Frightened Lady'' & ''Man Without A Heart'' for their tenth album ''Confessions Of The Mind,'' which was produced by John Burgess. 

On Tuesday, July 29, 1970 The Hollies recorded their twenty second single ''Gasoline Alley Bred'' at Abbey Road Studios.  

On Saturday, October 3, 1970 The Hollies ''Gasoline Alley Bred'' entered the UK charts reaching 14. 

In November 1970 The Hollies released their twelfth album ''Confessions Of The Mind'' on Parlophone PCS 7117, which entered the UK album charts on Saturday, November 28, 1970. 

On Sunday, December 6, 1970 The Hollies appeared on a BBC Session for David Lee Travis (DLT) (b. David Patrick Griffin, Friday, May 25, 1945, Buxton, Derbyshire, UK).

On Friday, January 8 and Saturday, January 9, 1971 The Hollies recorded the song ''Salvation Band'' at Abbey Road Studios. 

On Tuesday, March 16, 1971 The Hollies recorded ''Hay Willy'' at Air Studios, with Roger Coulam on organ (b. Roger Keith Coulam, Wednesday, April 26, 1944, England, UK) (of Blue Mink, ex-Jimmy Nicol and the Shubdubs, The Roger Coulam Quartet, Ugly Custard). 

On Wednesday, March 17, 1971 The Hollies recorded the song ''Father Machine'' at Air Studios. 

On Tuesday April 6, Wednesday, April 7, Thursday, April 8, Wednesday, April 14, Thursday, April 15, Friday, April 16, Wednesday, April 19, Thursday, April 20, Friday, April 21, Saturday, April 22, Sunday, April 23, Wednesday, May 5, Thursday, May 6, Wednesday, July 7, Thursday, July 8, Friday, July 9, Monday, July 12, Tuesday, July 13, Wednesday, July 14, Thursday, July 15, Friday, July 16, Tuesday, July 27, Wednesday, July 28, Thursday, July 29 & Friday, July 30, 1971 The Hollies recorded at Air Studios, a song ''Father Machine,'' ''Row The Boat Together'' the B-side of their  twenty-seventh US single ''Long Cool Women (In A Black Dress)'' for their album ''Distant Light,'' also the A-side of their twenty-fourth UK single & ''You Know The Score'' for their album ''Distant Light.'' ''Long Cool Women (In A Black Dress)'' had Clarke on lead guitar as well as lead vocals. 

On Saturday, May 22, 1971 The Hollies single ''Hay Willy'' entered the UK charts reaching 22.  

On Sunday, August 29, 1971 the band appeared on BBC Radio 1. 

In Late October 1971 Allan Clarke left the band. On Monday, October 25, 1971 it was announced by The Hollies manger Robin Britten that Clarke was leaving the group. He was replaced by lead vocalist Mikael Rickfors (b. December 4, 1948, Stockholm, Stockholm County, Sweden). Clarke would be invited to rejoin The Hollies in July 1973, after singing to RCA and cutting two solo albums. 

Rickfors formed his first band at 10 in 1958 called Mike's Skiffle Group. In 1967 he joined Swedish band Bamboo as lead vocalist, bassist, who released two singles before they split in 1970. 

Thursday, October 14, 1971 The Hollies recorded at Air Studios, ''Oh Granny'' the B-side of their twenty-eighth single. This was the first time Rickfors recorded with the band. 

Wednesday, December 8, Thursday, December 9, 1971 and Monday, January 10, 1972 The Hollies recorded at Air Studios ''The Baby'' (orchestra added), the A-side of their twenty-eight US single. 

On Saturday, February 26, 1972 The Hollies single ''The Baby'' entered the UK charts reaching 26 in March 1972. This was the first and only hit with Rickfors on lead vocals. The song was written by Chip Taylor (b. John Wesley Voight, March 21, 1940, Yonkers, New York, USA), younger brother of actor John Voight. 

On Monday, April 17, Tuesday, April 18 and Wednesday April 19, 1972 The Hollies recorded at Abbey Road Studios ''India Girl'' the B-side of their twenty-seventh UK single, a song ''Heaven On Her Heart'' & ''Words Don't Come Easy'' for their fourteenth album ''Romany.'' 

On Thursday, April 13, 1972 the band recorded ''Delaware Taggert And The Outlaw Boys'' & ''Touch'' and at Abbey Road Studios and the following day at the same place, Friday, April 14 1972 ''Touch'' & Romany'' all these tracks for their fourteenth album ''Romany'' & a song ''Papa Rain.'' 

On Thursday, April 27 & Friday, April 28, 1972 The Hollies recorded the song ''On The Summer Side Of Life'' at Abbey Road Studios. 

On Monday, May 1, Tuesday, May 2, Wednesday, May 3 and Wednesday, May 4, 1972  the band recorded at Abbey Road Studios ''Blues In The Morning'' & ''Jesus Was A Crossmaker'' for their fourteenth album ''Romany.''

On Monday, May 8 and Tuesday, May 9, 1972 the band recorded at Abbey Road Studios ''Down River'' & ''Magic Women Touch'' for their fourteenth album ''Romany.''

On Monday, July 24, Tuesday, July 25, Wednesday, July 26, Thursday, July 27 & Friday, July 28, 1972 at Abbey Road Studios the band recorded ''Courage Of Your Convictions'' for their fourteenth album ''Romany'' & the track ''Witchy Women.''

On Wednesday, August 2, 1972 The Hollies single ''Long Cool Women (In A Black Dress)'' entered the UK charts reaching 32. This single on Tuesday, August 8, 1972 entered the US charts reaching 2 on Saturday, September 12, 1972.   

On Saturday, August 26, Sunday, August 27, Monday, August 28, Tuesday, August 29 and Wednesday, August 30, 1972 at Abbey Road Studios, The Hollies recorded ''Slow Down'' & ''Won't Feel Good In The Morning'' for their fourteenth album ''Romany,'' with John Robinson (b. John Peter Robinson, Sunday, September 16, 1945, Fulmer, Buckinghamshire, UK) on organ. 

On Tuesday, September 12, 1972 the group recorded the song ''Nearer To You'' and two days later the song ''If It Wasn't For The Reason'' on Thursday, September 14, 1972, both at Abbey Road Studios. 

Friday, October 6, 1972 The Hollies recorded ''Magic Woman Touch'' the A-side of their twenty-seventh UK single at Abbey Road Studios. 

On Saturday, December 2, 1972 ''Long Dark Road'' entered the US charts reaching 26. 

 

Discography

UK 45's 

Friday, May 17, 1963 (Ain't That) Just Like Me/Hay What's Wrong With Me Parlophone R 5030  

Friday, August 16, 1963 Searchin'/All World Over Parlophone R 5O52 

Friday, November 15, 1963 Stay/Now's The Time Parlophone R 5077  

Friday, February 21, 1964 Just One Look/Keep Off That Friend Of Mine Parlophone R 5104 

Friday, May 15, 1964 Here I Go Again/Baby That's All Parlophone R 5137 

Friday, September 11, 1964 We're Through/Come On Back Parlophone R 5178  

Friday, January 22, 1965 Yes I Will/Nobody Parlophone R 5232  

Friday, May 21, 1965 I'm Alive/You Known He Did Parlophone R 5287  

Friday, August 27, 1965 Look Through Any Window/So Lonely Parlophone R 5322  

Friday, December 3, 1965 If I Needed Someone/I've Got A Way Of My Own Parlophone R 5392  

Friday, February 18, 1966 I Can't Let Go/Running Through The Night Parlophone R 5409   

Friday, June 17, 1966 Bus Stop/Don't Run And Hide Parlophone R 5469  

Friday, September 16, 1966 After The Fox/The Fox-Trot (Artist not listed) United Artists UP 1152 Peter Sellers and The Hollies  

Friday, October 8, 1966 Stop! Stop! Stop!/It's You Parlophone R 5508  

Friday, February, 10, 1967 On A Carousel/All The World Is Love Parlophone R 5562  

Friday, May 26, 1967 Carrie Anne/Signs That Will Never Change Parlophone R 5602 

Friday, September 22, 1967 King Midas In Reverse (Graham Nash)/Everything Is Sunshine Parlophone R 5637 

Friday, March 22, 1968 Jennifer Eccles/Open Up Your Eyes Parlophone R 5680  

Friday, September 27, 1968 Listen To Me/Do The Best You Can Parlophone R 5733  

Friday, February 28, 1969 Sorry Suzanne (Tony Macauley, Geoff Stephens)/Not That Way At All Parlophone R 5765  

Friday, September 19, 1969 He Ain't Heavy....He's My Brother (Bobby Russell, Bobby Scott)/Cos You Like To Love Me Parlophone R 5806  

Friday, April 10, 1970 I Can't Tell The Bottom From The Top/Mad Professor Blyth Parlophone R 5837 

Friday, September 18, 1970 Gasoline Alley Bred/Dandelion Wine Parlophone R 5862  

May 1971 Hay Willy (Allan Clarke, Roger Cook, Roger Greenaway)/Row The Boat Together  (Allan Clarke) Parlophone R 5905 

Friday, February 4, 1972 The Baby (Chip Taylor)/Oh Granny Polydor 2058 199 

Friday, February 4, 1972 Long Cool Women (In A Black Dress) (Allan Clarke, Roger Cook, Roger Greenaway)/Cable Car Parlophone R 5939 

Friday, November 10, 1972 Magic Woman Touch/Indian Girl Polydor 2058 403 

US 45's 

Friday, January 31, 1964 Stay/Now's The Time Liberty 55674 

March 1964 Just One Look/Keep Off That Friend Of Mine Imperial 66026 

June 1964 Here I Go Again/Lucille Imperial 66044

September 1964 We're Through/Come On Back Imperial 66070 

March 1965 Yes I Will/Nobody Imperial 66099

June 1965 I'm Alive/You Known He Did Imperial 66119

September 1965 Look Through Any Window/So Lonely Imperial 66134 

February 1966 I Can't Let Go/I've Got A Way Of My Own Imperial 66158 

July 1966 Bus Stop/Don't Run And Hide Imperial 66186 

October 1966 Stop! Stop! Stop!/It's You Imperial 66214 

October 1966 After The Fox/The Fox-Trot (Instrumental) United Artists UA 50079 Peter Sellers and The Hollies  

March 1967 On A Carousel/All The World Is Love Imperial 66231 

May 1967 Pay You Back With Interest/Whatcha Gonna Do About It Imperial 66240 

Friday, May 26, 1967 Carrie Anne/Signs That Will Never Change Epic 5-10180 

September 1967 Just One Look/Running Through The Night Imperial 66258 

Friday, September 15, 1967 King Midas In Reverse /Water On The Brain Epic 5-10234 

Friday, November 3, 1967 Dear Eloise/When Your Lights Turned On Epic 5-10251 

Friday, February 16, 1968 Jennifer Eccles/Try It Epic 5-10298 

Friday, July 19, 1968 Do The Best You Can/Elevated Observation Epic 5-10361 

Friday, September 27, 1968 Listen To Me/Everything Is Sunshine Epic 5-10400 

Friday, March 7, 1969 Sorry Suzanne/Not That Way At All Epic 5-10454 

Friday, September 26, 1969 He Ain't Heavy....He's My Brother/Cos You Like To Love Me Epic 5-10532

Monday, April 20, 1970 I Can't Tell The Bottom From The Top/Mad Professor Blyth  Epic 5-10613 

Wednesday, November 4, 1970 Gasoline Alley Bred/Dandelion Wine Epic 5-10677  

1971 Carrie Anne/He Ain't Heavy....He's My Brother Epic 5-2306 

Wednesday, March 17, 1971 Survival Of The Fittest/Man Without A Heart Epic 5-10716

Wednesday, July 28, 1971 Hay Willy/Row The Boat Together (Allan Clarke) Epic 5-10754 

Tuesday, March 7, 1972 The Baby/Oh Granny Epic 5-10842 

Wednesday, May 17, 1972 Long Cool Women (In A Black Dress)/Look What We Got Epic 5-10871 

Tuesday, October 10, 1972 Long Dark Road/Indian Girl Epic 5-10920

UK EP's 

June 1964 The Hollies (Tracks: Rockin' Robin, What Kind Of Love, What'cha Gonna Do About It, When I'm Not There) Parlophone GEP 8909 

July 1964 Just One Look (Tracks: Just One Look, Keep Off That Friend Of Mine, I'm Talking About You, Lucille) Parlophone GEP 8909  

October 1964 Here I Go Again (Tracks: Here I Go Again, Baby That's All, You'd Better Move On, Memphis) Parlophone GEP 8915 

December 1964 We're Through (Tracks: We're Through, Come On Back, What Kind Of Boy, You'll Be Mine) Parlophone GEP 8927 

April 1965 In The Hollies Style (Tracks: Too Much Money Business, To You My Love, Come On Home, What Kind Of Boy) Parlophone GEP 8934 

September 1965 I'm Alive (Tracks: I'm Alive, You Know He Did, Honey And Money, Mickey's Monkey) Parlophone GEP 8942  

June 1966 I Can't Let Go (Tracks: I Can't Let Go, Look Through Any Window, I've Got A Way Of My Own, So Lonely) Parlophone GEP 8951

UK Albums 

January 1964 Stay With The Hollies Parlophone PMC 1220 

November 1964 In The Hollies Style Parlophone PMC 1235 

Wednesday, September 1, 1965 The Hollies Parlophone PMC 1261 

Wednesday, June 1, 1966 Would You Believe Parlophone PMC 7008  

Friday, December 9, 1966 For Certain Because Parlophone PMC 7011  

1967 Vintage Hollies World Record Club ST 979 

June 1967 Evolution Parlophone PMC 7022  

November 1967 Butterfly Parlophone PMC 7039  

August 1968 Hollies' Greatest Hits Parlophone PMC 7057  

May 1969 Hollies Sing Dylan Parlophone PMC 7078  

November 1969 Hollies Sing Hollies Parlophone PCS 7092 

November 1970 Confessions Of The Mind Parlophone PCS 7116  

Friday, October 8, 1971 Distant Light Parlophone PAS 1005 

Wednesday, November 1, 1972 Romany Polydor LP 238144 

US Albums 

1964 Here I Go Again Imperial 12265 

1965 Hear! Here! Imperial 9299 

1966 Beat Group! Imperial 12312 

1966 Bus Stop Imperial 9330 

1967 Dear Eloise/King Midas In Reverse Epic LN  24344 

May 1967 The Hollies Greatest Hits Imperial 9350/12350  

1969 He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother Epic BN 2658 

November 1970 Confessions Of The Mind Epic KE 30255 

April 1972 Distant Light Epic KE 30958 

Wednesday, November 1, 1972 Romany Epic KE 31992 


Some Two Teens concerts: 

Wednesday, November 19, 1958: The Hippodrome Theatre, Hyde Road, Ardwick Green, Manchester 12, Lancashire, UK 

Some Hollies concerts: 

Sunday, Autumn 1962: The Two J's Club, 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK, first ever gig 

Sunday, September 30, 1962: The Oasis Club, 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK, 2pm - 4.30pm

Tuesday, December 4, 1962: The Oasis Club, 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK, evening

Wednesday, December 5, 1962: The Oasis Club, 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK

Sunday, December 9, 1962: The Oasis Club, 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK,  2pm - 4.30pm  

Sunday, December 23, 1962: The Oasis Club, 45 - 47 Lloyd Street, off Albert Square, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK 

Sunday, February 3, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, an eight hour Rhythm & Blues marathon, with The Beatles, Kingsize Taylor and the Dominoes with Swinging Cilla (Black), The Merseybeats, The Road Runners, Earl Preston and the TT's, The Swinging Blue Jeans, their d?but at this club 

Friday, February 22, 1963: The Twisted Wheel Club, 30 Brazennose Street, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK, their debut at this club 

Friday, March 22, 1963: The Regal Ballroom, Alderley Edge, Cheshire, UK, with Wayne Fontana and the Jets, The Country Gentlemen   
Saturday, March 23, 1963: The Twisted Wheel Club, 30 Brazennose Street, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, lunchtime session 

Wednesday, March 27, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, with The Karl Denver Trio, The Big Three, Earl Preston and the TT's, The Sapphires, evening session  

Friday, March 29, 1963: The Fire Station Dance Hall, Rochdale, Lancashire, UK, supported by Paul Stevens and the Javelins, Dek Boner and the Kentuckies 

Wednesday, April 17, 1963: The Imperial Ballroom, Carr Road, Nelson, Lancashire, UK 

Friday, May 3, 1963: The Twisted Wheel Club, 30 Brazennose Street, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK 

Sunday, May 19, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, headlined by Gene Vincent, with Tommy Quickly and the Challengers 

Friday, May 24, 1963: The Twisted Wheel Club, 30 Brazennose Street, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, with Faron's Flamingos, The Decibels, Sonny Webb and the Cascades  

Friday, May 31, 1963: The Kingfisher, 25a Warren Street, Andrew Square, Stockport, North East Cheshire, UK 

Wednesday, June 12, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, with Vince Earl and the Talismen 

Friday, June 14, 1963: The Twisted Wheel Club, 30 Brazennose Street, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK 

Wednesday, June 26, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, with Vic and the Spidermen, Chick Graham and the Coasters 

Friday, June 28, 1963: The Assembly Rooms, Tamworth, Staffordshire, UK, with Johnny Fox and the Hunters, The Emperors, 8pm - 1pm  

Sunday, June 30, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, supported Kerry Lester, as did The Red River Jazzmen, Vince Earl and the Talismen 

Monday, July 1, 1963:  The Twisted Wheel Club, 30 Brazennose Street, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK

Saturday, July 13, 1963: The Outlook Club, 52 - 60 Corporation Road, Middlesborough, North Yorkshire, UK, with The Rolling Stones 

Saturday, July 13, 1963: The Twisted Wheel Club, 30 Brazennose Street, Manchester 2, Lancashire, UK 

Sunday, July 14, 1963: The Three Coins Dance and Coffee Club, 64 Fountain Street off Market Street, Manchester, Lancashire, UK 
Sunday, July 21, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, with The Chants, The Del-Renas 

Tuesday, July 23, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, lunchtime session 

Tuesday, July 23, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, with Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated, Denny Seyton and the Sabres, The Mofits, The Bob Ross Group, evening session  

Saturday, August 24, 1963: The Pier Ballroom, The Pier, Hastings, East Sussex, UK 

Saturday, August 31, 1963: The Stanley Stadium, Liverpool, Lancashire, UK, with Billy J Kramer and the Dakotas, The Searchers, Mike Sarne 

Wednesday, October 9, 1963: The Majestic Ballroom, Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK 

Wednesday, October 30, 1963: The Cavern Club, 8 - 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool 2, Lancashire, UK, with The Hustles, The Beachcombers, Bobby and the Bachelors 

Monday, November 11, 1963: The Memorial Hall (The Victory), Chester Way, Northwich, Cheshire, UK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963: The Mcllroy's Ballroom, Swindon, Wiltshire, UK 

Friday, November 15, 1963: The Palace Ballroom, Maryport, Cumberland, UK, with Billy Steele and the Strollers, advertised as The Fabulous Hollies.   

Saturday, November 23, 1963: The Wigan Empire, Wigan, Lancashire, UK, supported by The Beat Boys  

Friday, November 29, 1963: The California Ballroom, Whipsnade Road, Dunstable Downs, Dunstable, Bedfordshire, with The Puppets, The Kinsmen 
Wednesday, January 1, 1964: BBC TV's Top Of The Pops, with Dusty Springfield, The Rolling Stones, The Swinging Blue Jeans, The Dave Clark Five, the first ever show

Sunday, January 12, 1964: The Pier Ballroom, The Pier, Hastings, East Sussex, UK 

Friday, January 24, 1964: The Glenlyn Ballroom, Forest Hill, South West London, UK, supported by The Detours (who soon became The Who)  

Saturday, February 1, 1964: The Imperial Ballroom, Carr Road, Nelson, Lancashire, UK

Saturday, February 8, 1964: The Regal Cinema, Corner of Fore Street & Silver Street, Edmonton, North London, UK, first date of tour 

Saturday, February 15, 1964: All NiteRave, Club Noreik, High Road, Tottenham, North London, UK, 12am - 6am 

Friday, February 27, 1964: The Mcllroy's Ballroom, Swindon, Wiltshire, UK, supported by The Whispers 

Saturday, February 8 - Saturday, March 7, 1964: The John Leyton Tour. The Running Order Was: The Le Roys, Billy Boyle, Don 'Fireball' Spencer, Billie Davis, Mike Sarne. Interval, then: The Innocents, Jet Harris, The Rolling Stones, Mike Berry and the Innocents, John Leyton. The Later Dates (It changed at some point to the line-up that appeared in Bradford): The Le Roys, Billy Boyle, Don 'Fireball' Spencer, Billie Davis. Interval, then: Jet Harris, Mike Sarne, The Rolling Stones, The Swinging Blue Jeans, John Leyton. In the middle of the tour, Bern Elliot and the Fenmen, joined. By March 1964, The Hollies, The Paramounts and Eden Kane were added. The Compere was Don 'Fireball' Spencer. The promoter was Robert Stigwood. 

Sunday, March 1, 1964: The Empire, Lime Street, Liverpool 1, Lancashire, UK, The Hollies, The Paramounts, Eden Kane joined the tour  
Monday, March 2, 1964: The Albert Hall, North Circus Street, Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, UK 

Tuesday, March 3, 1964: The Opera House, Church Street, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK 

Wednesday, March 4, 1964: The, Gaumont Cinema, New Victoria Street, Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK 

Thursday, March 5, 1964: The Odeon, Blackburn, Lancashire, UK 

Friday, March 6, 1964: The Gaumont, Snow Hill, Wolverhampton, Warwickshire, UK

Saturday, March 7, 1964: The Winter Gardens, Marine Road Central, Morecambe, Lancashire, UK, last date of tour, not sure if Hollies played here   

Saturday, March 7, 1964: The Pier Ballroom, The Pier, Hastings, East Sussex, UK 

Sunday, March 15 - Sunday, May 31, 1964: The Rolling Stones UK Tour, supported by many bands, including Freddie and the Dreamers, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, Pete MacLaine and the Four Just Men. Not sure which dates The Hollies played  The first date of the tour was on Sunday, March 15, 1964 at The Invicta Ballroom, Chatham, Kent, UK. The last date was on Sunday, May 31, 1964 at The Empire Pool, Wembley, Middlesex, UK

Sunday, March 15, 1964: The King George's Hall, Northgate, Blackburn, Lancashire, UK

Sunday, March 29 - Thursday, May 14, 1964: The Dave Clark Five & The Hollies UK Tour, with Mark Wynter, The Kinks, The Mojos, The Trebletones. The compare was Frank Berry 

Sunday, March 29, 1964: The Coventry Theatre, Coventry, Warwickshire, UK, first date of the tour 
Monday, March 30, 1964: The Futurist Theatre, Foreshore Road, South Bay, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, UK 

Tuesday, March 31, 1964: The De Montfort Hall, Leicester, Leicestershire, UK

Wednesday, April 1, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, UK 

Thursday, April 2, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Warwick Road, Carlisle, Cumberland, UK 

Friday, April 3, 1964: The City Hall, Northumberland Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumbria, UK 
Saturday, April 4, 1964: The City Hall, Barker's Pool, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK 
Sunday, April 5, 1964: The Gaumont Cinema, New Victoria Street, Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK 
Monday, April 6, 1964:  The Granada Cinema, 186 Powis Street, Woolwich, South East London, UK
Tuesday, April 7, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, UK 
Wednesday, April 8, 1964: The Granada Cinema, Mitcham Road, Tooting, South West London, UK 
Thursday, April 9, 1964: The ABC, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK 
Friday, April 10, 1964: The Granada, St Peters Street, Bedford, Bedfordshire, UK

Saturday, April 11, 1964: The Theatre Royal, Norwich, Norfolk, UK

Sunday, April 12, 1964: The Embassy Cinema, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, UK 

Tuesday, April 14, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Dover, Kent, UK 
Wednesday, April 15, 1964: The ABC Cinema, South Street, Romford, Essex, UK 

Thursday, April 16, 1964: The Odeon Theatre, Chelmsford, Essex, UK 

Friday, April 17, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Salter Gate, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK 

Saturday, April 18, 1964: The Apollo Theatre, Stockport Road, Ardwick Green, Manchester, Lancashire, UK 

Sunday, April 19, 1964: The Odeon Theatre, Epsom Road, Guildford, Surrey, UK

Tuesday, April 21, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Hallgate, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, UK 
Wednesday, April 22, 1964: The Granada Cinema, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, UK 

Thursday, April 23, 1964: The Granada Theatre, Castle Gates, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK
Friday, April 24, 1964: The Capitol, Dock Street, Cardiff, South Glamorgan, South Wales, UK 

Saturday, April 25, 1964: The Winter Gardens, Exeter Road, Bournemouth, Dorset, UK

Sunday, April 26, 1964: The Hippodrome Theatre, Middle Street, Brighton, East Sussex, UK 

Sunday, April 26, 1964: ''The New Musical Express Poll Winners Concert'' The Empire Pool, Wembley, Middlesex, UK, with The Beatles, The Dave Clark Five, Gerry and the Pacemakers plus many others

Tuesday, April 28, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Abington Square, Northampton, Northamptonshire, UK 
Wednesday, April 29, 1964: The Gaumont Cinema, Wolverhampton, Warwickshire, UK 

Thursday, April 30, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Taunton, Somerset, UK 

Friday, May 1, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Southampton, Hampshire, UK 

Saturday, May 2, 1964: The Astoria Cinema, Junction of Isledon Road & Seven Sisters Road, 232 - 236 Seven Sister's Road, Finsbury Park, North West London, UK

Sunday, May 3, 1964: The Odeon Theatre, Loampit Vale, Lewisham, South East London, UK 

Tuesday, May 5, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Kingston-upon-Hull, East Yorkshire, UK
Wednesday, May 6, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, UK 
Thursday, May 7, 1964: The Globe Theatre, Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, UK, with The Dave Clark Five, The Kinks, The Mojos, Mark Wynter 
Friday, May 8, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK
Saturday, May, 9, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Derby, Derbyshire, UK
Sunday, May 10, 1964: The Odeon Theatre, Walthamstow, East London, UK
Monday, May 11, 1964: The Odeon Theatre, High Street, Southend-on-Sea, Essex, UK
Tuesday, May 12, 1964: The Colston Hall, Bristol, Somerset, UK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964: The Granada Cinema, Harrow, Middlesex, UK

Thursday, May 14, 1964: The Granada Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, UK, last date of tour  

Thursday, May 21, 1964: The Locarno Ballroom, Swindon, Wiltshire, UK 

Sunday, May 31, 1964: Pop Hit Parade, The Empire Pool, Wembley, Middlesex, UK, with Adam Faith, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, Freddie and the Dreamers, Julie Grant, Eden Kane and the Downbeats, The Barron Knights with Duke D'Mond, The Merseybeats, The McKinleys, The Rolling Stones, The Roulettes, Kevin Scott and the Kinsmen, The Swinging Blue Jeans, The Undertakers. The promoter was Tito Burns and the compere was David Jacobs, from 2.30pm 

Monday, July 27 - Saturday, August 22, 1964: Big Holiday Attraction, All Star Parade, The Gaumont, Weymouth, Dorset, UK, with Big Dee Irwin, Shane Fenton and The Fentones, Blues By Five, Linda Doll, Syd & Eddie. The promoters were Joe Collins & the George Cooper Organisation & the compare was Larry Burns 

Monday, July 27, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK, first date 

Tuesday, July 28, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Thursday, July 30, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Friday, July 31, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK 

Saturday, August 1, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Sunday, August 2, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Monday, August 3, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Wednesday, August 5, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Thursday, August 6, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Friday, August 7, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Saturday, August 8, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Sunday, August 9, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Monday, August 10, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Tuesday, August 11, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Wednesday, August 12, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Thursday, August 13, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Friday, August 14, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Saturday, August 15, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Sunday, August 16, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Monday, August 17, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Tuesday, August 18, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Wednesday, August 19, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Thursday, August 20, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Friday, August 21, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK

Saturday, August 22, 1964: The Gaumont Theatre, Weymouth, Dorset, UK, last date 

Saturday, August 29, 1964: The Imperial Ballroom, Carr Road, Nelson, Lancashire, UK 

Thursday, September 10, 1964: The Locarno Ballroom, Swindon, Wiltshire, UK, supported by Linda Laine and the Sinners 

Saturday, September 19 - Sunday, October 18, 1964: Freddie and The Dreamers & The Hollies Autumn 1964 Tour with The Four Pennies, Tony Jackson and the Vibrations, Marianne Faithfull, The Toggery Five. The Compare was Don Dwight 

Saturday, September 19, 1964: The Adelphi Cinema, Slough, Berkshire, UK, first date of the tour 

Sunday, September 20, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK 

Monday, September 21, 1964: The Top Rank, Southampton, Hampshire, UK 

Tuesday, September 22, 1964: The Top Rank, Taunton, Somerset, UK 

Wednesday, September 23, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Exeter, Devon, UK

Thursday, September 24, 1964: The ABC Theatre, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, UK 

Sunday, September 27, 1964: The ABC Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, UK

Monday, September 28, 1964: The Top Rank, Luton, Bedfordshire, UK

Tuesday, September 29, 1964: The Top Rank, Birmingham, Warwickshire, UK 

Thursday, October 1, 1964: The Odeon Theatre, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK 

Friday, October 2, 1964: The ABC Theatre, Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, UK 

Sunday, October 4, 1964: The Empire Theatre, Lime Street, Liverpool 1, Lancashire, UK 

Monday, October 5, 1964: The Top Rank, Cardiff, South Glamorgan, South Wales, UK  

Tuesday, October 6, 1964: The Top Rank Suite, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, UK  

Wednesday, October 7, 1964: The ABC Cinema, Chester, Cheshire, UK 

Thursday, October 8, 1964: The Odeon, Oxford Street, Manchester, Lancashire, UK 

Friday, October 9, 1964: The City Hall, Barker's Pool, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK  

Saturday, October 10, 1964: The Rank, Worcester, Worcestershire, UK 

Sunday, October 11, 1964: Unknown venue, UK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964: Unknown venue, UK 

Thursday, October 15, 1964: The Rank, Glasgow, Strathclyde, Scotland, UK  

Saturday, October 17, 1964: The City Hall, Northumberland Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumbria, UK 

Sunday, October 18, 1964: The Rank, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK, last date of the tour 

Friday, October 23, 1964: The Essoldo, Tunbridge, Kent, UK

Saturday, October 24, 1964: The Theatre Royal, Norwich, Norfolk, UK

Sunday, October 25, 1964:  The Regal Theatre, Boston, Lincolnshire, UK

Monday, October 26, 1964: The Rex Ballroom, Haselmere, Surrey, UK

Tuesday, October 27, 1964: The Gaumont Cinema, Watford, Hertfordshire, UK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964: The ABC Theatre, Ipswich, Suffolk, UK

Thursday, October 29, 1964: The Danilo Cinema, Cannock, Staffordshire, UK 

Friday, October 30, 1964: The California Ballroom, Whipsnade Road, Dunstable Downs, Dunstable, Bedfordshire, UK, supported by Freddie Fingers Lee and the Shreekers, The Chequers and or 

Saturday, October 31, 1964: The California Ballroom, Whipsnade Road, Dunstable Downs, Dunstable, Bedfordshire, UK, supported by Freddie Fingers Lee and the Shreekers, The Chequers 

Saturday, October 31, 1964: The Baths Hall, Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire, UK

Sunday, November 1, 1964: The De Montfort Hall, Granville Road, Leicester, Leicestershire, UK

Monday, November 2, 1964: The Granada Cinema, Dartford, Kent, UK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964: The Granada Cinema, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, UK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964: The Granada Cinema, Grantham, Lincolnshire, UK

Thursday, November 6, 1964: The Essoldo, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, UK  

Wednesday, November 7, 1964: The Plaza, Handsworth, Birmingham, Warwickshire, UK 

Thursday, November 8, 1964: The Coventry Theatre, Hales Street, Coventry, Warwickshire, UK 

Friday, November 20, 1964: The Wimbledon Palais, Corner of Merton High Street and Merton Road, Merton, Surrey, UK, with Scene V

Tuesday, November 24, 1964: The Cavern, 10 Matthew Street, Liverpool, Lancashire, UK, with The Kirkbys, Earl Preston's Realms. The Hollies set was recorded for Radio Luxembourg 

Saturday, December 19, 1964: The Marcham Hall, March, Cambridgeshire, UK 

Saturday, December 19, 1964: The Lakeside Scene, The Old Welsh Harp, The Broadway, Hendon, North West London, UK 

February, 1965: The Top Twenty Club, Tollbar House, Corner Ashton New Road, Market Street, Droylesden, Manchester 43, Lancashire, UK 

Saturday, February 20, 1965: The Imperial Ballroom, Carr Road, Nelson, Lancashire, UK

Monday, February 22, 1965: The Majestic Ballroom, Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK

Friday, February 26, 1965: The California Ballroom, Whipsnade Road, Dunstable Downs, Dunstable, Bedfordshire, with The Bo Street Runners, Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich, The Jaguars 

Saturday, March 6 - Thursday, March 18, 1965: The Rolling Stones Fifth UK Package Tour, 14 date, twice-nightly show, with Dave Berry and the Cruisers, The Konrads, The Checkmates, Goldie and the Gingerbreads 

Saturday, March 6, 1965: The Empire Theatre, Lime Street, Liverpool 1, Lancashire, UK, two shows 

Sunday, March 7, 1965: The Palace Theatre, 97 Oxford Street, Manchester 1, Lancashire, UK, two shows 

Monday, March 8, 1965: The Futurist Theatre, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, UK, two shows

Tuesday, March 9, 1965: The Odeon Theatre, Sunderland, County Durham, UK, two shows

Wednesday, March 10, 1965: The ABC Theatre, Market Street, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, two shows

Thursday, Friday, March 11, 1965: The City Hall, Barkers Pool, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK, two shows

Friday, March 12, 1965: The Trocadero Theatre, Leicester, Leicestershire, UK, two shows

Saturday, March 13, 1965: The Granada Theatre, Rugby, Warwickshire, UK, two shows

Sunday, March 14, 1965: The Granada Theatre, Rochester, Kent, UK, two shows

Monday, March 15, 1965: The Odeon Theatre, Epsom Road, Guildford, Surrey, UK, two shows

Tuesday, March 16, 1965: The Granada Theatre, Greenfield, Middlesex, UK, two shows

Wednesday, March 17, 1965: The Odeon Theatre, High Street, Southend-on-Sea, Essex, UK, two shows

Thursday, March 18, 1965: The ABC Theatre, South Street, Romford, Essex, UK, two shows

Saturday, March 20, 1965: The Memorial Hall, (The Victory), Chester Way, Northwich, Cheshire, UK, with The R B Five, The Impacts 

Wednesday, March 31, 1965: The Kinema Ballroom, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, UK, plus support by The Rockin' Berries, The Red Hawks

Saturday, April 3, 1965: The Astoria Ballroom, Rawtenstall, Lancashire, UK, supported by The Mutineers, The Saracens   

Friday, April 16 - Friday, April 23, 1965: First US Tour, The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA, a week long engagement, staring Little Richard and others   

Friday, April 16, 1965: The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA, first date of tour 

Saturday, April 17, 1965: The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA 

Sunday, April 18, 1965: The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA 

Monday, April 19, 1965: The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA 

Tuesday, April 20, 1965: The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA 

Wednesday, April 21, 1965: The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA

Thursday, April 22, 1965: The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA 

Friday, April 23, 1965: The Paramount Theatre, Brooklyn, New York City, N.Y., USA, last date of tour 

Friday, May 14, 1965: The California Ballroom, Whipsnade Road, Dunstable Downs, Dunstable, Bedfordshire, UK, supported by The Half Dozen, The Dominators 

Saturday, May 30, 1965: The Northwich Memorial Hall, Northwich, Cheshire, UK, with The Notions, Some People 

Monday, June 7, 1965: The Memorial Hall (The Victory), Chester Way, Northwich, Cheshire, UK, supported by The Clayton Squares, The Hideaways 

Tuesday, June 15 - Friday, June 18, 1965: Small Tour Of Scotland, headlined by The Rolling Stones, The Moody Blues, with The Cannon Brothers, The Checkmates. The promoter was Albert Bonici 

Tuesday, June 15, 1965: The Odeon, Renfield Street, Glasgow, Strathclyde, Scotland, UK, two shows, first date of the tour  

Wednesday, June 16, 1965: The Usher Hall, Lothian Road, Edinburgh 1, Lothian, Scotland, UK, two shows 

Thursday, June 17, 1965: The Capitol Theatre, Union Street, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, UK, two shows 

Friday, June 18, 1965: The Caird Hall, City Square, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, UK, two shows, last date of the tour

Sunday, June 20, 1965: The Pontiac Club, Zeeta House, Putney, South West London, UK, with Ray Anton and the Peppermint Men 

Saturday September 18 - Tuesday, September 28?, 1965: Ten Day US Tour, with The Yardbirds 

Saturday, September 18, 1965: McCormack's Place, Chicago, Cook and DePage County, Illinois, USA, first date of tour 

Tuesday, September 28?, 1965: Unknown venue, USA, last date of tour 

Saturday, October 2, 1965: The Imperial Ballroom, Carr Road, Nelson, Lancashire, UK 

Thursday, November 3, 1965: The Odeon, Oxford Street, Manchester 1, Lancashire, UK, guest star Paul Jones, with The Small Faces, The Nashville Teens, Paul and Barry Ryan, Peter Jay and the Jaywalkers 

Friday, November 19, 1965: The Glad Rag Ball, Empire Pool, Wembley, Middlesex, UK, with The Kinks, The Who, Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames, The Barron Knights, Wilson Pickett, John Lee Hooker, Geno Washington & The Ram Jam Band, The Birds, The Masterminds, The Golden Apples of the Sun, Ted Heath & His Music, Cathy McGowan, Denny Piercy, The Merseybeats. Radio Caroline Disc Jockeys: Tom Lodge, Ugli Ray Terret, all night dancing, 9pm - 4pm  

December 4, 1965: The Memorial Hall (The Victory), Chester Way, Northwich, Cheshire, UK, supported by The Notions  

December 24, 1965: The Memorial Hall (The Victory), Chester Way, Northwich, Cheshire, UK 

Friday, December 31, 1965: The New Century Hall, New Century House, Corporation Street, Manchester, Lancashire, UK, with The Just Four Men, The Mockingbirds

Sunday, January 16, 1966: The Ultra Club, Hassocks Village, Mid West Sussex, UK 

Tuesday, January 18, 1966: The Town Hall, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, UK

Wednesday, January 19, 1966: The Locarno, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UK 

Saturday, January 30, 1966: The Top Twenty Club, Corner of Ashton New Road, Market Street, Droylsden, Lancashire, UK 

Thursday, March 3, 1966: Dublin University, Dublin, County Dublin, Eire 

Friday, March 25, 1966: The Marine Club, Morecambe, Lancashire, UK

Saturday, May 7, 1966: Unknown venue, Pismo Beach, California, USA, last date of the tour, Eric Haydock's last gig with the band 

Wednesday, May 11, 1966: The Locarno Dance Hall, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UK, with out bass player as Haydock failed to show  
 
Saturday, May 14, 1966: Loughborough College, Loughborough, Lincolnshire, UK, may have been cancelled 

Monday, May 16, 1966: The Queens Hall, Wolverhampton, Warwickshire, UK, probably cancelled 

Thursday, May 19, 1966: The Locarno Dance Hall (Ballroom), Streatham Hill, South West London, UK, cancelled 

Saturday, May 21, 1966: The Locarno Dance Hall (Ballroom), Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UK  

Saturday, May 21 - Monday, June 13, 1966: The Scandinavian Tour (Denmark & Sweden), with Bernie Calvert on bass 

Monday, May 23, 1966: The Hit House, Copenhagen, Denmark

Tuesday, May 24, 1966: The Hit House, Copenhagen, Denmark

Wednesday, May 25, 1966: The Hit House, Copenhagen, Denmark   

Thursday, May 26, 1966: The Locarno Ballroom, Sunderland, County Durham, UK

Monday, May 30, 1966: The Imperial Ballroom, Carr Road, Nelson, Lancashire, UK 

Saturday, June 18, 1966: The Queen's College, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK 

Friday, June 24, 1966: The Princess Club, Barlow Moor Road, Chorlton-Cum-Hardy, Manchester 21, Lancashire, UK

Monday, June 27, 1966: The Gaumont, Snow Hill, Wolverhampton or The Queen's Hall, Wolverhampton, Warwickshire, UK 

Tuesday, June 28, 1966:  The Queen's Hall, Wolverhampton, Warwickshire, UK 

Saturday, July 2, 1966: The Floral Hall, Promenade, Southport, Lancashire, UK 

Friday, July 29, 1966: The Central Pier, Morecombe, Lancashire, UK, Calvert on bass as a permanent member  

Saturday, July 30, 1966: The Imperial Ballroom, Carr Road, Nelson, Lancashire, UK 

Sunday, July 31, 1966:  The North Pier, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK

Sunday, August 7, 1966:  The North Pier, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK 

Sunday, August 14, 1966: The North Pier, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK 

Wednesday, August 17, 1966: The Sherwood Rooms, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, UK 

Thursday, August 18, 1966: The Locarno Dance Hall, Streatham Hill, South West London, UK

Friday, August 19, 1966: The Hillside, Hertford, Hertfordshire, UK

Saturday, August 20, 1966: The Royal Hall, Bridlington, East Yorkshire, UK 

Sunday, August 21, 1966: The North Pier, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK 

Thursday, August 25, 1966: The Birdcage Club, Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK 

Friday, August 26, 1966: The Memorial Hall, Barry, South Glamorgan, South Wales, UK 

Saturday, August 27, 1966: The Winter Gardens Pavilion, Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, UK

Sunday, August 28, 1966: The North Pier, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK 

Tuesday, August 31, 1966: The Orchid Ballroom, Purley, Kent, UK 

Thursday, September 1, 1966: The Locarno Ballroom, Bristol, Somerset, UK

Friday, September 2, 1966: The Casino Club, Wigan, Lancashire, UK 

Saturday, September 3, 1966: The Pavilion Arts Centre, Buxton, Derbyshire, UK

Sunday, September 4, 1966: The Fiesta Club, Norton Road, Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, UK 

Monday, September 5, 1966: The Fiesta Club, Norton Road, Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, UK 

Sunday, September 25, 1966: The Fiesta Club, Norton Road, Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, UK

Friday, September 30, 1966: The Big Bam Fall Spectacular, Montgomery, Alabama, USA

Saturday, October 1, 1966: The Municipal Auditorium, Birmingham, Alabama, USA

Saturday, October 15 - Saturday, November 6, 1966: Small English Tour headlined by The Hollies, special guest The Small Faces, Paul Jones, Paul & Barry Ryan, The Nashville Teens, Robb Storme and the Whispers, Peter Jay and the New Jaywalkers. The compere was Ray Cameron 

Saturday, October 15, 1966: The ABC Cinema, Aldershot, Hampshire, UK, first date of the tour 

Sunday, October 16, 1966: The ABC Cinema, South Street, Romford, Essex, UK

Tuesday, October 18, 1966: The Odeon Theatre, Winchcombe Street, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, UK

Wednesday, October 19, 1966: The Capital Theatre, Dock Street, Cardiff, South Glamorgan, South Wales, UK

Thursday, October 20, 1966: The Gaumont Cinema, Corporation Street, Taunton, Somerset, UK

Friday, October 21, 1966: The Gaumont Cinema, Wolverhampton, Warwickshire, UK

Saturday, October 22, 1966: The ABC Theatre, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, UK  

Sunday, October 23, 1966: The ABC Cinema, Kingston-upon-Hull, East Yorkshire, UK  

Monday, October 24, 1966: The Gaumont Theatre, St Helen's Street, Ipswich, Suffolk, UK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966: The ABC Cinema, Northampton, Northamptonshire, UK

Thursday, October 27, 1966: The Regal Cinema, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK

Friday, October 28, 1966: The ABC Cinema, Saltergate, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK

Saturday, October 29, 1966: The ABC Cinema, Chester, Cheshire, UK

Sunday, October 30, 1966: The Gaumont Theatre, Coventry, Warwickshire, UK

Tuesday, November 1, 1966: The Gaumont Theatre, Worcester, Worcestershire, UK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966: The ABC Cinema, Station Road, Wigan, Lancashire, UK

Thursday, November 3, 1966: The Odeon, Oxford Street, Manchester 1, Lancashire, UK 

Thursday, November 4, 1966: The Odeon Theatre, The Headrow, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK

Friday, November 5, 1966: The Odeon, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK or 

Friday, November 5, 1966: The Sheffield City Hall, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK

Saturday, November 6, 1966: The City Hall, Northumberland Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 1, Northumbria, UK, last date of the tour

Sunday, December 4, 1966: Deautschllandhalle, Berlin, Germany  

Saturday, March 11 - Sunday, April 2, 1967: Nationwide Tour, with The Spencer Davis Group, Paul Jones, The Tremeloes, Richard Kent Style, The Young Idea. Dave Butler was the compere and it was promoted by Kennedy Street Enterprises and Peter Walsh 

Saturday, March 11, 1967: The Granada Cinema, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, UK, first date of the tour  

Monday, March 13, 1967: The Gaumont Theatre, Hallgate, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, UK

Wednesday, March 15, 1967: The Odeon Theatre, The Headrow, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK  

Friday, March 17, 1967: The Granada Cinema, Maidstone, Kent, UK  

Saturday, March 18, 1967: The Granada Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, UK

Sunday, March 19, 1967: The De Montfort Hall, Granville Road, Leicester, Leicestershire, UK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967: The Odeon, Oxford Street, Manchester, Lancashire, UK 

Wednesday, March 22, 1967: The Granada Theatre, Kettering, Northamptonshire, UK

Thursday, March 23, 1967: The Astoria, Junction of Isledon Road and Seven Sisters Road, Finsbury Park, North West London, UK

Sunday, April 2, 1967: The Empire Theatre, Lime Street, Liverpool 1, Lancashire, UK, last date of the tour

Saturday, August 19, 1967: Mariebergsskoken, Karlstad, Sweden

Wednesday, August 23, 1967: Folkets Park, Vanersborg, Sweden 

Monday, November 13 - Sunday, December 10, 1967: American Tour 

Monday, November 13, 1967: Unknown venue, USA, first date of the tour 

Sunday, December 10, 1967: Unknown venue, USA, last date of tour 

Wednesday, February 14, 1968: The Whiskey A Go Go, West Hollywood, California, USA

Saturday, May 17 - Wednesday, May 29, 1968: The Hollies Spring Tour '68, a 12 date twice nightly tour, with The Scaffold, The Mike Vickers Orchestra, Paul Jones

Saturday, May 17, 1968: The Grenada Cinema, Castle Gates, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK, first date of the tour  

Sunday May 19, 1968: The Palace Theatre, 97 Oxford Street, Manchester 1, Lancashire, UK 

Saturday, May 24, 1968: The Odeon, Loampit Vale, Lewisham, South East London, UK, recorded by EMI for a live album     

Wednesday, May 29, 1968: The Odeon Theatre, Derby, Derbyshire, UK, last date of tour 

Monday, July 28, 1968: Folkets Park, Vanersborg, Sweden

Saturday, August 9, 1968: Prokurative, Split, Croatia   

Saturday, September 7, 1968: Colour Me Pop, BBC2 TV, London, UK

August 1968: The Hollies play a UK Cabaret Season   

January 1969: Cardiff University, Cardiff, South Glamorgan, South Wales, UK, Terry Sylvester's debut gig with the group    

Saturday, May 10, 1969: Earlham Park, Norwich, Norfolk, UK 

Monday, May 26, 1969: Liseberg, Gothenburg, Sweden 

Tuesday, June 17, 1969: The BBC Studios, London, UK

Friday, October 31, 1969: The City Hall, Northumberland Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumbria, UK 

Thursday, August 20, 1970: Liseberg, Gothenburg, Sweden 

Saturday, October 31, 1970: The Belfry, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham, Warwickshire, UK  

Thursday, February 4, 1971: The Canberra Theatre, Canberra, New South Wales, Australia 

Thursday, October 19, 1972: The Kleinhans Music Hall, Buffalo, NY, USA

Wednesday, November 22, 1972: The Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Santa Monica, California, USA

John H. Warburg
15/4/15

Memories

I worked for about a year at a "cash/credit" store called Washington's on Deansgate, with the entrance on Queen St in 1965.

Graham Nash and Alan Clarke both met and worked there in the early 60s and left just before I started.

Their first record was called "Just like me". I bought a copy from Bakers & Sons TV and Record shop on Ashton New Rd in 1964. That record was the worst record I ever bought. Probably why it's never mentioned anywhere.

Alan Clarke's "mam", worked at Washington's as the tea lady. Big urn of tea very sugary and I remember, for the 10-10.30am break and the 3-3.30pm break. She always had a fag on, with the ash bending at the end and at least once I caught it falling gently into the tea she was stirring up.

I remember Alan Clarke and his sister coming into the store after he had just got back from a successful tour of America, sometime in 1965. I asked him for his autograph, but I lost it the same day.

Mike Barlow

Where to start! I live in Finland - been here since 65.

Met The Hollies or the boys in 62, knew all the Manchester groups - Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, etc. We were friends not groupies, as  I went to art school and so did some of the boys around.

I remember Graham Nash coming back from the dentist with 4 new front teeth.  Allan and me were out side the Oais Club in Jackson Row waiting and we both thought that it was the best thing ever.  They were implanted and that was a new thing then.

Allan gave me his or there 1st demo disk by the Fourtones called Whimaway, I still have it.

Many memories, we did a lot in 4 years before I came here. The only regret I have from those days is that I never took pictures.

Angela Reponen ne Wyner
19/4/10

I recall a gig The Hollies were playing in Rochdale around 1963. It was at the Champness Hall and they were booked as support act with Dusty Springfield as the main attraction.

I worked at a grocers shop and was delivering a basket of groceries to the venue when the doorman recognised me as being one of the Travellers pop group and invited me in to watch them rehearsing. I forgot myself and after some spontaneous applause was advised to leave.

I later found out that the show was a sham, Dusty wasn't even booked to appear and the guy who organised it had done a bunk with the ticket money. Dont know if they got paid for that one.  

Dave Brierley
8/8/10

The original lineup formed late 1962 was Allan Clarke, lead vocals, Graham Nash, rhythm guitar and vocals, Vic Steele (Vic Farrell), lead guitar, Eric Haydock, bass guitar and Don Rathbone, drums.

Vic Farrell decided he couldn’t become a full time musician and left the group in May 1963, shortly before they signed to Parlophone as label-mates of The Beatles.

Tony Hicks of the Nelson group “The Dolphins” replaced Farrell on lead guitar and later Bernie Calvert and then Bobby Elliott both also of The Dolphins replaced Haydock and Rathbone respectively.

Hope this is of help. Thanks,


Tony Farrell
14/5/11

I was The Hollies' first bass guitarist - for ten seconds!

Two lads, I'm sure Bobby was one, and I think Hicksy too, came down to my old house in Franklin Street, Patricroft.  They asked me to join and I said yes, until they said they were going to turn pro.

Having an engineering apprenticeship at the time, I didn't want to suddenly change things, so I had to turn them down - but for ten seconds.  Now who's a fool!? 

Bernard Morris
12/9/11

59th Street Bridge were a Band from the Burnley, Nelson and Colne area in the mid to late 60's and as Bobby and Tony (as well as Bernie) from The Hollies were all local lads, we thought we could do the same.

Although we didn't hit the same heady heights as they did we worked solidly for a couple of years on a professional basis, mostly we worked with Paul Ingham of Sounds Entertainments Agency in Whitefield but also managed to secure a lot of our own work. Remember The 7 Stars in Heywood?

It was Paul Ingham who, after the Band split up in 1970, encouraged me to go solo and also to cut a demo disc ( acetate ) to send to The Hollies as Alan Clarke had just left to pursue his own career.  I had a very polite letter back from their Manager to say a Swedish guy (Michael Rickfors?) had got the job - temporarily as it happened!

Early in the 80's I was (and still am) in the Motor Trade and sold cars to Bobbie Elliot (and his cousin) and from then on we have had a good few drinks together at The Sparrow Hawk in Fence .. a tiny village outside Burnley.

I've continued singing and playing over the years, having recorded approx. 70 tracks, some of which can be heard on my web site. I would send Bobbie copies of any new CD which I'd produced and he always replied along with kind and encouraging comments.

There are 2 tracks on my site from " Staying Power ", all vocals and harmonies by myself.

For me The Hollies have everything musically and I will continue to cheer them on while wishing them well for their 50th Anniversary Tour.


Geoff Lingard
28/12/11

Just recalled a gig at the Mirlees Social Club, Hazel Grove. I was lead vocals with The Estelles, on the same bill was The Hollies. 

The reason I am recalling this gig is to verify what real genlemen The Hollies were, especially Graham.  Pprior to us doing our set, The Hollies had already set up their eqipment, which was all brand new, provided by there record company,as they had already recorded their first disc.

Graham came to me in the dressing room and invited us to use their eqipment, everything included except the drums. I accepted the offer and when we performed it improved our performance 100 per cent, as our p/a consisted of the ever popular reslo mikes and a 100watt amp.

I could not believe the system  - they had made my job so much easier. After we had finished we were packing our gear up (by the way gear has a different connotation these days, ,back to the story)

In the dressing room The Hollies were taking their strings off their guitars and replacing the strings with actual cotton strings.  When I asked why, Graham replied that they were going to London to do some filming either for t/o/t/pops or a film, I can't quite remember.

Another time they borrowed our van to go to London,and the van broke down but needless to say they returned it to us in running order - showing once more what true gents they were and still are.

If anyone wants to recall a few more stories about the 60s, Rick the lead guitarist with The Estelles, had a book published called The 60s remembered.  Unfortunately Rick has passed away RIP but the book makes him live on with all his recollections of the r/r scene in the 60s.

yours truly

Colin Reeves.
7/3/12

PS I am still gigging and keep getting encores so while I can do it Ii will keep on ROCKIN.

In the article on The Hollies there is a slight error. The mention of Parlophone record label being mainly a comedy label is quite wrong.

Although a lot of comedy material was featured  there was a great deal of other stuff issued on the label that was successful in the six years before the rise of the Beatles and the others, when George Martin was working there.

In the NME charts there were 27 records (you can check this fact) that were in the Top Ten and only  five of those were actual comedy discs.

Acts such as The Vipers, Jim Dale & Matt Monro had big Top Ten Hits , not to mention two number ones by Adam Faith.

Sorry for being so pedantic. The piece on The Hollies was great.

Mick Jones
23/10/13


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MN
There is a 1964 single on HMV label by a band called The Flintstones. Tracks are "Safari" and "Work Out".
The songwriter credit on "Work Out" reads Clark. Clarke and Clark, hmm?
Perhaps just a coincidence, but I can't find any info on these HMV label The Flintstones.
12th July 2015 5:33am
Alan Thompson
Oh, I remember Alan, his mum used to work at Washingtons on Deansgate and paid for most of his gear !
14th June 2015 7:42am
Heather Stewart
It's not really much info.. And I'd have to ask around.. But my dad apparently knew The Hollies.. I mean knew them quite well.. He was going to join them, apparently (or so the family story was, he's dead now, so I can't ask him), he played Guitar.. He knew Eric Haydock.. The bassist best.. Eric used to have a shop near Stockport market in the 1980s, and I remember my dad taking my mum and I into the shop and saying to us, this is Eric Haydock, he was in The Hollies.. I remember a really grey haired man, with lots of hair.. Anyway.. My dad lived at number 1 Cornwall Crescent, Brinnington.. And it was said "The Hollies" came round there to practice.. In his mum (my grans) front room.. Now looking at your list of info on the Hollies.. I'm trying to figure out if maybe my dad was involved with Kirk Daniels and the Delta's or The Dominators of Rhythm.. As you list no earlier bands that Eric Haydock was involved in on there.. And it either must've been ... Read More
25th June 2014 8:09pm

   



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