My Story - Pete Taylor

MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS

In 1959 at the age of 16, I worked as a telegram boy in the G.P.O. and of course was into all the music of the day.

One day a guy named Geoff Profitt brought his guitar into work. During our lunch hour all the other junior postmen gathered in the canteen to hear him play. Knowing most of the songs I joined in and sang along. Geoff said that he didn’t know that I could sing (neither did I) he then asked me if I would like to sing some songs that night in a youth club next door to Granada studios in Quay street.

I jumped at the chance, and we had a good night. He asked me to join the group, which of course I did. We worked together for some months, playing in youth clubs, but eventually drifted apart. Sadly, I have no pics or names of other members of this group.

I started going into pubs in the Manchester area, where I knew that they had a resident pianist or duo - The Parkside, The Robin Hood, The Claremont (I lied about my age). I used to get up on stage and give a couple of songs.

In North Manchester one night - The Bottom Derby as it was known, I was asked to join a couple of guys and form a trio, which I did, and we became known as The Treetones. We gigged around for some 18 months doing pubs, clubs, and private parties. The two other guys were brothers. The eldest, Alan, played lead and his brother Brian played bass, and they hailed from Clayton.

In 1961 I found myself with yet another group, we never got round to giving ourselves a name, and I can’t remember the names of one single member, how sad is that? We did a few gigs but nothing of any consequence, and eventually we split up.

In 1962 I answered an ad in the paper for an audition for a singer, to be held at  The Three Coins coffee bar in Manchester.  After the audition I was offered the job which I accepted.

The group consisted of lead & bass guitar with drummer. I am unable to name one of them. They all originated from Rhyl, but were now based in Bolton. The group was called The Persuaders and they worked for Danny Betesh at Kennedy Street Enterprises.

We worked well together and were doing some great gigs, when we were called in to see Danny. He told me that he had a problem with one of his acts - a singer called Deke Rivers, who I knew quite well. It seemed that Deke's band The Big Sound had walked out on him and he needed a new group. Danny wanted me to drop out of The Persuaders, who would then become The Big Sound.

None of the group was very happy about this situation, but it was their bread, and butter, and I had a fulltime job at the time. We parted the best of friends, and the group told me that I could keep the name The Persuaders for when I would form another group, which happened a lot sooner than I expected.

Within a matter of weeks I was asked to join another group.

The rhythm guitarist was an acquaintance of mine called Midge because of his small stature. The names of the other two members escapes me now, but the group was called The Javelins.  This all happened at the end of June 1962.

The work was rather good and regular for such a new group and everything went well until late November of that year, when I decided to bleach my hair blond for effect, as the rest of the group were dark haired. This was at the time a thing that was happening on the group scene, black haired singer, blond group, or reverse. It took hours to get my hair sorted, and it was wet for the whole period, resulting in me catching pneumonia, and being ill for many weeks. The group were doing very well and were losing work because of my illness, so they had to take on a new singer.

In February of 1963 I was introduced to a group called The Aztecs and became their singer.

After a couple of months we changed our names to Pete and The Persuaders - a change of name a change of luck.

The line up was Peter Taylor (vocals), Sidney Overett (lead guitar), Brian Valentine (rhythm), Martin Sleater (bass) and Dennis Ashton (drums).

We worked very hard and with lots of practice, auditions, talent comps, and the like, we became very popular in the Manchester area.

We had a chance to audition for the Decca record company which we were all very excited about.

On Friday 23rd August 1963, we had a gig at a pub called The Queens Arms in a small village in Doveholes in Derbyshire.

That same night, The Beatles were appearing about three miles away in Buxton and naturally we expected to be playing to an empty house but this was not the case. 

We had a full house and lots of fun but this was not to last.

We left The Queens at about 12:15am on the 24th August, with a friend of the group at the wheel but we didn’t reach home.

Our van left the road and hit a cottage killing Sid Overett (19yrs old), and Brian Valentine (17yrs old). The rest of the group were seriously injured and hospitalised in the Stockport Infirmary.

The next few months were, at the least, traumatic.

We had, of course, lost our van and most of our stage equipment in the crash and due to help from The Beatles, Danny (Mr Moonriver) Williams, Karl Denver and many other Manchester artists, also many clubs in the area putting on charity shows for us, we were eventually able to reform the group, under the name of Pete Taylor and The New Persuaders with two new members whose surnames I cannot recall, the lead guitarist was Vic and the rhythm was called Peter.

Unfortunately, due to our past experience, I was unable to settle and I was not happy with the sound that we were getting, so I left the group in the middle of 1964 and for the next 18 months or so I didn’t do anything in the entertainment business.

Late in 1965 I was asked by a group called The Pulsators to join them - which I did.


The Pulsators - Mick, Pete, stand in drummer, Laurence and Graham - at The Fusiliers

Our line-up was Mick Cavanagh (lead), Laurence and Graham Myers (brothers—lead & rhythm), Pete Taylor (vocals) and during our time together we had two drummers whose names I am not sure of. We had some good work in pubs and clubs until mid 1967, when Laurence decided that he wanted to quit and concentrate on his fulltime job.

Within a couple of weeks we had found another rhythm guitarist, Dennis, but by this time our drummer was feeling unhappy and so we parted company.

Fortunately within days we were approached by a drummer called Brian Rogers. His group The Sioux had split up and he wanted us, if we got together, to change our names to The Sioux because he already had the name painted on his bass drum, and so we did.

THE SIOUX - line-up mid 1967

Pete Taylor - vocals
Mick Cavanagh - lead
Dennis Neill - rhythm & harmony
Graham Myers - bass
Brian Rogers  - drums & harmony

Late in 1967 I left the group for a short while, until I returned in Feb 68. The line up changed once again to:

THE SIOUX - line-up 1968

Pete Taylor - vocals
Mick Cavanagh - lead
Brian Hunt - rhythm & harmony
Collin Priest - bass & harmony
Brian Rogers - drums & harmony

In late March 68, Brian dropped out leaving us a four man group.  During this time we started ad-libbing comedy which stuck and eventually we worked out a comedy routine whereby I did a full spot in drag.

I didn’t want to be taken seriously as a drag artist - the spot was very tongue in cheek but was well received by our audiences.

The group went through a lot of changes over the years regarding group members coming and going especially bass guitarists, and it was at about this time that we added “Showgroup” to our name.

Incidentally the group was never known as The Sioux Show Band - it was always Showgroup.

   

1970

Pete Taylor  - vocals
Mick Cavanagh - lead
John? - bass & harmony
Brian Rogers  - drums & harmony

Early 1972

Pete Taylor  - vocals
Brian Greenwood  - lead
(Zac passed away in 1990s, sadly missed)
John? - bass & harmony
Brian Rogers  - drums & harmony

Early 1973

Pete Hobson (Hobbo), a very good friend of Zac, joins as bass.

This line-up is puctured below:

 
 
 

The Sioux Showgroup
Pete Hobson, Brian Greenwood, Pete Taylor and
Brian Rogers

Magnet trio
The Magnet Trio - Zac, Hobbo and Pete

 

 

In spring 1975, the reason escapes me why at this time, Zac, Hobbo and I ended up without Brian and  took the name The Magnet Trio (pictured right).

We always joked that our name would draw in the crowds - and the show we gave was well received.

We worked a lot in South Wales, The North East, & and the Greater Manchester area.

   

We were finalists in the Piccadilly Radio talent contest held in Platt Fields Park in the summer of that year.

The trio lasted about twelve months, after which Hobbo decided he had had enough, and so gave up playing to concentrate on his family.

   
   
   

How it happened I don’t really remember but Zac and myself once again ended up back in The Sioux Showgroup with Brian and a new bass guitarist from Hayfield in Derbyshire called Ray, who stayed with us for a little over two years, when he decided to emigrate to Australia.

1978 we were then joined by Bob from North Manchester, who unfortunately had to leave the group due to ill health.

   

Circa 1976 - Zac, Pete, Brian and Ray
   
   


Above: Mick, Pete, Brian, Ray.

In 1979 we were joined by Tony Lingard (above right), who remained with the group until I finally left in late 1980, to remarry and concentrate on a new wife and new career.

My place in the group was taken by a very nice guy called Rob Shelton.

I lost touch with the The Sioux for some time after I left, but years later learned that Rob had sadly passed away, aged 40.

I don’t know what became of some of the people I worked with over the years, but I will always have fond memories of them all. I had some wonderful fun, and remember those days with a small lump in my throat, and would not change a single memory. I just hope that I will be remembered in the same way by mates still with us.

Brian Valentine (Val) passed away 24th August 1963.
Sidney Overett, (Sid) passed away 24th August 1963.
Brian Greenwood (Zac) passed away 1990s.

 
I am still in touch with some of my old group mates.

  • Brian Rogers, now Brad Rogers, living in Reddish.
  • Peter Hobson (Hobbo) still working, living in Prestwich, and trying desperately to win the lottery.
  • Dennis Ashton, living in Worsley, and running his own business.
  • Martin Sleator, living in Spain, also happily running his own business.

As for myself, I happily live in Liverpool (I’m a plastic Scouser) I can’t work as I’m now disabled, but still enjoy a good couple of hours now and then, up in my loft, with an old 100 watt p.a, an old CopyCat echo chamber, and neighbours who must all be daft or deaf  - I haven’t got the courage to ask.

PeteTaylor
20/5/09

Memories

Pete, I remember the you and the Persuaders. Sid Overett was a good friend of mine. I played with a group called Barry and the Horizons at that time and Sid was engaged to our drummer's (Dave Thorpe) sister Sheena Thorpe.  He often came to my house with his guitar for a jam and sometimes he would dep for us when one of our lads was ill.  It's the first time I have seen a photo of him.  I went to the funeral and helped carry the coffin. I think I may have some press cuttings stashed away somewhere. I will try to find and upload them.

Douglas Gill
18/6/09

I used to enjoy listening to you sing in the Robin Hood on Lloyd Street. I didn`t dream then that I`d one day play lead guitar myself in two pub bands. Remember Martin Doyle who played piano in the Robin?  I also never dreamt I`d one day live in Ireland.  Martin and his wife Phyllis were from Dublin. 

You were excellent back then and I always enjoyed your singing. Remember Danny Fontana?  Last time I saw and heard him was when he was running the City Road Inn in Hulme, in the Seventies. I was in two pub bands with my son Matthew who now has his own little recording studio over here. He`s written music for years. There`s one of our songs on Youtube called Something Wonderful  - Clearlight Studio if you want to have a look and listen. I write lyrics for him. Glad you`re o.k. 

Best wishes, Alec

Alec Adcock
16/5/10

Hi Pete, I depped for Dennis Ashton (he was on holiday) 2 weeks prior to the tragic accident that took the life of my good mate Sid. You actually played at Doveholes whilst I was standing in for Dennis, fantastic night.  Now living in Adelaide South Australia, been here since 1975. Great to catch up with old mates.

Dave Thorpe 
19/10/11

Four of us went most weeks, Ann Buckley, David Flaherty, John Harvey and myself,(met John 45yrs later on a cruise in the C/bean last year (OMG)in the 60's we danced the night away. Ann and I always had matching outfits we looked like twins. I will always remember being hypnotised by Alvin Stardust's blue eyes, when I was standing right at the front. The Isley Brothers records always remind me of that place.

We never saw any trouble neither everyone friendly, thank you Belle Vue for happy memories.

Elizabeth Cooper nee Harrison
1/7/11

 


Ho yes! I remember waiting for my membership card to arrive. I missed the first two or three weeks I was just 12 years old, but big for my age. 

I can remember standing in line and handing in my membership card and being asked for my date of birth, I had put on the application a date that made me just 17 , not the minimum 16 that the Top Ten Club took . My heart pounded as the biggest bouncer  I can ever remember seeing looked  me in the eye and wished me happy birthday,  I was in.

My mate Norman, was three or four places behind me, but I keep walking just in case he got stopped at the door but no, he got in as well, and then we looked around us, we soon found the soda fountain on the ground floor, and had Cooke over crushed ice, it was like being in a film set to us, We had only thought things like this existed in the USA, as the place filled up we walked on the dance floor  and soon joined in doing, shaking all over , I don't know why but I can't  remember  the who played, that night.

I do remember  running like mad to catch the last 125 bus to get home to Hollingsworth,  poor Norman had another mile to walk back to walk to Hadfield,  I knew that night I was going to go every week, but the cost was a  big problem. I got 2/6  pocket money  and the ticket had that week been 3/6 , the bus fairs and a coke, and cigs had put cost up to over a pound.  I needed money!  But the only part time work going around our way was only for over 14 year olds. 

That week I applied for two paper rounds, and a part time job as a butcher's boy, after all I had passed as 17, so age was not going to be a bar to getting anything I wanted. To my amassment I got all the jobs, so it was let the good time roll, well on a Sunday night any way.

Then my dad told me  that I could only keep staying out late on a Sunday night if I did better at school, So I used part of the money to pay the butcher wife, she was a teacher , to help me with the 3Rs , and soon I was moved up at school.  From that first week I never missed a single Sunday at the top ten club for years and on some of the best nights we walked the 11 miles home. I was in the snack bar queue the night the power went off and when emergency lighting kicked in the all the food was gone! 

We watched all the top acts of the time, up close, standing at the edge of the stage, and I meet and talked to Jimmy Saville off TV! And I can't remember paying over 5/-

I had some fab nights and meet some super friends at the club, I honestly think that the TTC changed my life  -  for the better. 

Chris O'Brien  (Cober)
29/7/11


Myself and my mate Linda Fitzgerald went to the Top Ten Club every Sunday.

We loved it! There was Jimmy Saville and Ray Teret.  We used to go to work mesmerised back in the day.

HAPPY DAYS. GOD BLESS U JIMMY SAVILE you won't be forgotten xxxxxxxxxxxx

Susan Cheadle nee Latham
1/11/11


R.I.P Sir Jimmy Saville

I used to work on the food and refreshment bar during the Top Ten Club. It was great to be able to hear the groups  singing  yeh the Hollies, Hermans Hermits,Rolling Stones etc.

I do remember a particular busy night and finally getting everthing cleaned up and put away and wanting to get home!

Jimmy saville came up looking for a cold drink  and the manager made me go into the Cellar to bring up drinks for Jimmy and I think Simon Dee may of been with him.

Sadly for me having to work I was a young married mum with two kids I only got to go to the Top Ten Club once.

I loved that era.

Margaret White
1/11/11


Went to the Top Ten Club from 1964 til 1968. 

Yes, I remember Jimi Hendrix playing there, but oh no! I didn't appreciate him at all as I was in to dancing. 

Jimmy Saville playing the discs and me rocking and sliding to River Deep. Can anyone remember Jimmy playing a "disc" of the Beatles coughing, sneezing and burping?

I always went there by myself but was usually asked to dance by some guy. 

The Drifters played there and Jimmy asked me if I wanted to meet them - I wasn't really interested but was taken through some double doors and ended up shaking hands with them.

Jimmy once arranged for the Hall to be specially opened for disabled young people and I offered to go and help.  He ended up accompanying me to my mini van one night, it was parked on waste ground opposite the complex (no fears of vehicle theft then).  He sat in the passenger seat - lovely I thought (not!) as I knew he was used to a better class of vehicle, but a short while later he had bought a mini van and then I think he passed it on to someone else!

I also went to the Jungfrau and Oasis and occasionally the Manchester University dance.  I remember queuing outside in the cold wearing a ginger colour Wallis wool coat with a fox fur slung around my neck.  That night Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce and Clapton were playing in the main hall and I think Grahame Bond in the smaller hall.  We were packed like herrings in a box in the big hall. 

Were the admission prices cheap then? or did they seem cheap to me ( I was a student on a full grant) and life wasn't hard. 

Oh to be back then - wild dancing and being fancy free!  Now a staid 65 year old with grandchildren.       

Jos
23/12/11
 

Seen so many "names" at The Top ten Club on a Sunday night. Started going there way back 1964 when I wasn't allowed in the bar. It was coffee in the balcony. My mate Brian and I were very into a guitar instrumental band called The Outlaws. These were the house band of the Joe Meek recording studios.They backed many hit records of the early 60's including John Leyton, Glenda Jackson, Mike Berry,and many more. This is documented (somewhat reasonably accurately - partly not) in the film "Telstar".  The bass player,Chas Hodges became friends of ours, and whenever they played locally,we were backstage with Chas. When Billy Kuy, lead guitarist left, he was replaced by a newcomer - Rithchie Blackmore!

Brian and I got on with Ritchie really well. He drank coffee! On the occaisions that The Outlaws played at The Top Ten Club, and other Manchester venues, we were always welcomed backstage, and to any other goings on.

Brian and I reached official drinking age and used to go out with Chas in Manchester. Ritchie still wasn't a drinker back then. Ritchie left to join Heinz & The Wild Boys (we were still in touch,and allowed backstage). Then in 1969, we all know what he became capable of. Superstar guitarist.

We then lost touch with Ritchie,but did see him again after a Rainbow gig at The Apollo. During the late 60's/early 70's we saw Chas a few times-now playing with Cliff Bennet & The Rebel Rousers. Those were the days. We actually didn't realise then, the significance of it all. Through Chas, we got to meet The Kinks. The thing was, it was normal. Everyone was very friendly - no ego's at all. We took Chas to some of the really grotty dives in Manchester (anyone remember The Chanticlaire Club - that was a serious dump - but they seved rubbish beer late - for those days).

These were the days of The Top Ten Club,and other simillar venues. Bands that were going on to much bigger things played there. It was the "place to be", even if we didn't know it at the time. 

Times change, music changes,venues change - but thers's still a very good live music scene around Manchester. There's the main concert venues. Apollo, MEN Arena (a very large,impersonal place for very big names), The Academy 1 to 3 and other smaller venues.

I live in Bolton,and thankfully, we have good live music scene around here. Alam Inn (predominantly heavy metal), Dog & Partridge (very eclectic live bands), Moses Gate (quality tribute bands), Hark To Towler (Quality tribues), Railway Inn (quality tributes). It's all here.

Whatever the era/year. Good music is timelsss.

Terry
21/2/12

Four of us went most weeks, Ann Buckley, David Flaherty, John Harvey and myself,(met John 45yrs later on a cruise in the C/bean last year (OMG)in the 60's we danced the night away. Ann and I always had matching outfits we looked like twins. I will always remember being hypnotised by Alvin Stardust's blue eyes, when I was standing right at the front. The Isley Brothers records always remind me of that place.

We never saw any trouble neither everyone friendly, thank you Belle Vue for happy memories.

Elizabeth Cooper nee Harrison
1/7/11

 


Ho yes! I remember waiting for my membership card to arrive. I missed the first two or three weeks I was just 12 years old, but big for my age. 

I can remember standing in line and handing in my membership card and being asked for my date of birth, I had put on the application a date that made me just 17 , not the minimum 16 that the Top Ten Club took . My heart pounded as the biggest bouncer  I can ever remember seeing looked  me in the eye and wished me happy birthday,  I was in.

My mate Norman, was three or four places behind me, but I keep walking just in case he got stopped at the door but no, he got in as well, and then we looked around us, we soon found the soda fountain on the ground floor, and had Cooke over crushed ice, it was like being in a film set to us, We had only thought things like this existed in the USA, as the place filled up we walked on the dance floor  and soon joined in doing, shaking all over , I don't know why but I can't  remember  the who played, that night.

I do remember  running like mad to catch the last 125 bus to get home to Hollingsworth,  poor Norman had another mile to walk back to walk to Hadfield,  I knew that night I was going to go every week, but the cost was a  big problem. I got 2/6  pocket money  and the ticket had that week been 3/6 , the bus fairs and a coke, and cigs had put cost up to over a pound.  I needed money!  But the only part time work going around our way was only for over 14 year olds. 

That week I applied for two paper rounds, and a part time job as a butcher's boy, after all I had passed as 17, so age was not going to be a bar to getting anything I wanted. To my amassment I got all the jobs, so it was let the good time roll, well on a Sunday night any way.

Then my dad told me  that I could only keep staying out late on a Sunday night if I did better at school, So I used part of the money to pay the butcher wife, she was a teacher , to help me with the 3Rs , and soon I was moved up at school.  From that first week I never missed a single Sunday at the top ten club for years and on some of the best nights we walked the 11 miles home. I was in the snack bar queue the night the power went off and when emergency lighting kicked in the all the food was gone! 

We watched all the top acts of the time, up close, standing at the edge of the stage, and I meet and talked to Jimmy Saville off TV! And I can't remember paying over 5/-

I had some fab nights and meet some super friends at the club, I honestly think that the TTC changed my life  -  for the better. 

Chris O'Brien  (Cober)
29/7/11


Myself and my mate Linda Fitzgerald went to the Top Ten Club every Sunday.

We loved it! There was Jimmy Saville and Ray Teret.  We used to go to work mesmerised back in the day.

HAPPY DAYS. GOD BLESS U JIMMY SAVILE you won't be forgotten xxxxxxxxxxxx

Susan Cheadle nee Latham
1/11/11


R.I.P Sir Jimmy Saville

I used to work on the food and refreshment bar during the Top Ten Club. It was great to be able to hear the groups  singing  yeh the Hollies, Hermans Hermits,Rolling Stones etc.

I do remember a particular busy night and finally getting everthing cleaned up and put away and wanting to get home!

Jimmy saville came up looking for a cold drink  and the manager made me go into the Cellar to bring up drinks for Jimmy and I think Simon Dee may of been with him.

Sadly for me having to work I was a young married mum with two kids I only got to go to the Top Ten Club once.

I loved that era.

Margaret White
1/11/11


Went to the Top Ten Club from 1964 til 1968. 

Yes, I remember Jimi Hendrix playing there, but oh no! I didn't appreciate him at all as I was in to dancing. 

Jimmy Saville playing the discs and me rocking and sliding to River Deep. Can anyone remember Jimmy playing a "disc" of the Beatles coughing, sneezing and burping?

I always went there by myself but was usually asked to dance by some guy. 

The Drifters played there and Jimmy asked me if I wanted to meet them - I wasn't really interested but was taken through some double doors and ended up shaking hands with them.

Jimmy once arranged for the Hall to be specially opened for disabled young people and I offered to go and help.  He ended up accompanying me to my mini van one night, it was parked on waste ground opposite the complex (no fears of vehicle theft then).  He sat in the passenger seat - lovely I thought (not!) as I knew he was used to a better class of vehicle, but a short while later he had bought a mini van and then I think he passed it on to someone else!

I also went to the Jungfrau and Oasis and occasionally the Manchester University dance.  I remember queuing outside in the cold wearing a ginger colour Wallis wool coat with a fox fur slung around my neck.  That night Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce and Clapton were playing in the main hall and I think Grahame Bond in the smaller hall.  We were packed like herrings in a box in the big hall. 

Were the admission prices cheap then? or did they seem cheap to me ( I was a student on a full grant) and life wasn't hard. 

Oh to be back then - wild dancing and being fancy free!  Now a staid 65 year old with grandchildren.       

Jos
23/12/11
 

Seen so many "names" at The Top ten Club on a Sunday night. Started going there way back 1964 when I wasn't allowed in the bar. It was coffee in the balcony. My mate Brian and I were very into a guitar instrumental band called The Outlaws. These were the house band of the Joe Meek recording studios.They backed many hit records of the early 60's including John Leyton, Glenda Jackson, Mike Berry,and many more. This is documented (somewhat reasonably accurately - partly not) in the film "Telstar".  The bass player,Chas Hodges became friends of ours, and whenever they played locally,we were backstage with Chas. When Billy Kuy, lead guitarist left, he was replaced by a newcomer - Rithchie Blackmore!

Brian and I got on with Ritchie really well. He drank coffee! On the occaisions that The Outlaws played at The Top Ten Club, and other Manchester venues, we were always welcomed backstage, and to any other goings on.

Brian and I reached official drinking age and used to go out with Chas in Manchester. Ritchie still wasn't a drinker back then. Ritchie left to join Heinz & The Wild Boys (we were still in touch,and allowed backstage). Then in 1969, we all know what he became capable of. Superstar guitarist.

We then lost touch with Ritchie,but did see him again after a Rainbow gig at The Apollo. During the late 60's/early 70's we saw Chas a few times-now playing with Cliff Bennet & The Rebel Rousers. Those were the days. We actually didn't realise then, the significance of it all. Through Chas, we got to meet The Kinks. The thing was, it was normal. Everyone was very friendly - no ego's at all. We took Chas to some of the really grotty dives in Manchester (anyone remember The Chanticlaire Club - that was a serious dump - but they seved rubbish beer late - for those days).

These were the days of The Top Ten Club,and other simillar venues. Bands that were going on to much bigger things played there. It was the "place to be", even if we didn't know it at the time. 

Times change, music changes,venues change - but thers's still a very good live music scene around Manchester. There's the main concert venues. Apollo, MEN Arena (a very large,impersonal place for very big names), The Academy 1 to 3 and other smaller venues.

I live in Bolton,and thankfully, we have good live music scene around here. Alam Inn (predominantly heavy metal), Dog & Partridge (very eclectic live bands), Moses Gate (quality tribute bands), Hark To Towler (Quality tribues), Railway Inn (quality tributes). It's all here.

Whatever the era/year. Good music is timelsss.

Terry
21/2/12

Hi Pete, the missing name from the 1967 line up  is my dad  - he is called Denis Neill 

Jonny Neill
9/6/12

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Comments (3)

Topic: Peter Taylor - my story
Brian Hunt says...
Played with The Sioux as rhythm guitar. Mentioned in line up for 1968 on this page. Played The Fusiliers pub on Cross Lane Salford."Stage" pictured above also. Not in any photos though. You can see me in the line-up for Pat Casey & The ... Read More
1st August 2016 10:53pm
Dave Lodge says...
I remember Pete and The Sioux from the Offerton Palace Club, He was a very talented vocalist and had a great personality.
31st January 2016 12:05am
Brian Hunt says...
I'm the Brian Hunt referred to in Pete's story forming part of the line up in one of the group's many incarnations! I played rhythm guitar and more can be found about me and others in my biography of Pat Casey & The Sovereigns.
4th July 2015 7:44pm




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